Parental support buffers the association of depressive symptoms with cortisol and C-reactive protein during adolescence

Shu Sha Angie Guan, Julienne E. Bower, David M. Almeida, Steven W. Cole, Ronald E. Dahl, Michael R. Irwin, Teresa E. Seeman, Thomas McDade, Andrew J. Fuligni

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

17 Scopus citations

Abstract

Social experiences can affect the relationship between depression and physical health. The current study examined how social support from parents and friends may moderate the association of depressive symptoms with hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis activity and C-reactive protein among adolescents (N = 316, Mage = 16.40, SD = .74; 57% female) from diverse ethnic backgrounds (23.1% Asian, 29.1% European, 41.8% Latino, and 6.0% other backgrounds). Results indicated that parent support, but not friend support, moderated the link between depressive symptoms and both total daily cortisol output (a measure HPA activity) and C-reactive protein (a marker of inflammation). These patterns did not differ by ethnicity. Overall, the study highlights the continued, and perhaps accumulated, importance of parents during adolescence despite increasing needs for autonomy from and exploration outside of the family unit.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)134-143
Number of pages10
JournalBrain, Behavior, and Immunity
Volume57
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1 2016

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Immunology
  • Endocrine and Autonomic Systems
  • Behavioral Neuroscience

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    Guan, S. S. A., Bower, J. E., Almeida, D. M., Cole, S. W., Dahl, R. E., Irwin, M. R., Seeman, T. E., McDade, T., & Fuligni, A. J. (2016). Parental support buffers the association of depressive symptoms with cortisol and C-reactive protein during adolescence. Brain, Behavior, and Immunity, 57, 134-143. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.bbi.2016.03.007