Parenting in context: Impact of neighborhood poverty, residential stability, public services, social networks, and danger on parental behaviors

Ellen E. Pinderhughes, Robert Nix, E. Michael Foster, Damon Jones, Karen L. Bierman, John D. Coie, Kenneth A. Dodge, Mark Greenberg, John E. Lochman, Robert J. McMahon

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

210 Scopus citations

Abstract

This prospective longitudinal study examined the unique and combined effects of neighborhood characteristics on parental behaviors in the context of more distal and more proximal influences. With a sample of 368 mothers from high-risk communities in 4 parts of the United States, this study examined relations between race (African American or European American), locality (urban or rural), neighborhood characteristics, family context, and child problem behaviors, and parental warmth, appropriate and consistent discipline, and harsh interactions. Analyses testing increasingly proximal influences on parenting revealed that initial race differences in warmth and consistent discipline disappeared when neighborhood influences were considered. Although generally culture and context did not moderate other relations found between neighborhood characteristics, family context, and child behaviors, the few interactions found highlight the complex influences on parenting.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)941-953
Number of pages13
JournalJournal of Marriage and Family
Volume63
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 1 2001

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Anthropology
  • Arts and Humanities (miscellaneous)
  • Social Sciences (miscellaneous)

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Parenting in context: Impact of neighborhood poverty, residential stability, public services, social networks, and danger on parental behaviors'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this