Parents' support for school-entry requirements for human papillomavirus vaccination: A national study

William A. Calo, Melissa B. Gilkey, Parth D. Shah, Jennifer L. Moss, Noel T. Brewer

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

18 Scopus citations

Abstract

Background: The number of states proposing school-entry requirements for human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination has increased over the last decade. However, data are currently limited regarding parents' support of such laws. We sought to obtain the first national estimates of parents' support of HPV vaccination school-entry requirements. Methods: A national sample of 1,501 parents of 11-to 17-yearold children completed a web-based survey between November 2014 and January 2015. Analyses used multivariable logistic regression to assess correlates of support for school-entry requirements for HPV vaccination. Results: Overall, 21% of parents agreed that laws requiring HPV vaccination for school attendance are a good idea, and 54% disagreed. If school-entry requirements included opt-out provisions, agreement increased to 57%, and only 21% disagreed. Parents more often agreed with requirements without opt-out provisions if they were Hispanic [OR 1.53; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.05-2.22], believed HPV vaccine was as or more important than other adolescent vaccines (OR 2.76; 95% CI, 1.98-3.83), or believed HPV vaccine was effective for preventing cervical cancer (OR2.55; 95% CI, 1.93-3.37). Parents less often agreed if they resided in Midwest states or believed that HPV vaccine was being pushed to make money for drug companies (both P < 0.05). Conclusion: Opt-out provisions almost tripled parents' support for HPV vaccine school-entry requirements. Our findings suggest that race/ethnicity, attitudes about HPV vaccine, and region of residence may influence support for requirements without opt-out provisions. Impact: Opt-out provisions greatly increase parent support of school-entry requirements for HPV vaccination but maymake them ineffective.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1317-1325
Number of pages9
JournalCancer Epidemiology Biomarkers and Prevention
Volume25
Issue number9
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 2016

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Epidemiology
  • Oncology

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