Part of the yellow dog: U.S. coal miners' opposition to the company doctor system, 1936-1946

Alan V. Derickson

Research output: Contribution to journalComment/debate

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

By the mid-1930s, U.S. coal miners could no longer tolerate company doctors. They objected to the misuse of preemployment and periodic medical examinations and to many other facets of employer-controlled health benefit plans. The rank-and-file movement for reform received critical assistance from the Bureau of Cooperative Medicine, which conducted an extensive investigation of health services in 157 Appalachian communities. This study not only substantiated the workers' indictment of prevailing conditions but illuminated new deficiencies in the quality and availability of hospital and medical care as well. The miners' union curtailed the undemocratic, exploitative system of company doctors and proprietary hospitals by establishing the United Mine Workers of America Welfare and Retirement Fund in 1946.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)709-720
Number of pages12
JournalInternational Journal of Health Services
Volume19
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1989

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Coal
Dogs
Proprietary Hospitals
Retirement
Insurance Benefits
Health Services
Medicine
Miners

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Health Policy

Cite this

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abstract = "By the mid-1930s, U.S. coal miners could no longer tolerate company doctors. They objected to the misuse of preemployment and periodic medical examinations and to many other facets of employer-controlled health benefit plans. The rank-and-file movement for reform received critical assistance from the Bureau of Cooperative Medicine, which conducted an extensive investigation of health services in 157 Appalachian communities. This study not only substantiated the workers' indictment of prevailing conditions but illuminated new deficiencies in the quality and availability of hospital and medical care as well. The miners' union curtailed the undemocratic, exploitative system of company doctors and proprietary hospitals by establishing the United Mine Workers of America Welfare and Retirement Fund in 1946.",
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Part of the yellow dog : U.S. coal miners' opposition to the company doctor system, 1936-1946. / Derickson, Alan V.

In: International Journal of Health Services, Vol. 19, No. 4, 01.01.1989, p. 709-720.

Research output: Contribution to journalComment/debate

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