Particulate matter air pollution exposure, distance to road, and incident lung cancer in the nurses' health study cohort

Robin C. Puett, Jaime E. Hart, Jeff D. Yanosky, Donna Spiegelman, Molin Wang, Jared A. Fisher, Biling Hong, Francine Laden

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

77 Scopus citations

Abstract

Background: A body of literature has suggested an elevated risk of lung cancer associated with particulate matter and traffic-related pollutants. Objective: We examined the relation of lung cancer incidence with long-term residential exposures to ambient particulate matter and residential distance to roadway, as a proxy for trafficrelated exposures. Methods: For participants in the Nurses' Health Study, a nationwide prospective cohort of women, we estimated 72-month average exposures to PM2.5, PM2.5-10, and PM10 and residential distance to road. Follow-up for incident cases of lung cancer occurred from 1994 through 2010. Cox proportional hazards models were adjusted for potential confounders. Effect modification by smoking status was examined. Results: During 1,510,027 person-years, 2,155 incident cases of lung cancer were observed among 103,650 participants. In fully adjusted models, a 10-μg/m3 increase in 72-month average PM10 [hazard ratio (HR) = 1.04; 95% CI: 0.95, 1.14], PM2.5 (HR = 1.06; 95% CI: 0.91, 1.25), or PM2.5-10 (HR = 1.05; 95% CI: 0.92, 1.20) was positively associated with lung cancer. When the cohort was restricted to never-smokers and to former smokers who had quit at least 10 years before, the associations appeared to increase and were strongest for PM2.5 (PM10: HR = 1.15; 95% CI: 1.00, 1.32; PM2.5: HR = 1.37; 95% CI: 1.06, 1.77; PM2.5-10: HR = 1.11; 95% CI: 0.90, 1.37). Results were most elevated when restricted to the most prevalent subtype, adenocarcinomas. Risks with roadway proximity were less consistent. Conclusions: Our findings support those from other studies indicating increased risk of incident lung cancer associated with ambient PM exposures, especially among never- and long-term former smokers.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)926-932
Number of pages7
JournalEnvironmental health perspectives
Volume122
Issue number9
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 2014

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Health, Toxicology and Mutagenesis

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