Patch test reactions associated with sunscreen products and the importance of testing to an expanded series: Retrospective analysis of North American Contact Dermatitis Group data, 2001 to 2010

Erin M. Warshaw, Michael Z. Wang, Howard I. Maibach, Donald V. Belsito, Kathryn A. Zug, James S. Taylor, C. G. Toby Mathias, Denis Sasseville, Matthew J. Zirwas, Joseph F. Fowler, Joel G. DeKoven, Anthony F. Fransway, Vincent A. DeLeo, James Marks, Melanie D. Pratt, Frances J. Storrs

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

18 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Both active and inactive ingredients in sunscreen may cause contact dermatitis. Objectives: This study aimed to describe allergens associated with a sunscreen source. Methods: A cross-sectional analysis of patients patch tested by the North American Contact Dermatitis Group between 2001 and 2010 was performed. Results: Of 23,908 patients patch tested, 219 (0.9%) had sunscreen coded as an allergen source. Patients who were male, with occupational dermatitis, or older (older than 40 years) had significantly lower rates of allergic reactions to sunscreens; the most commonly affected areas were the face and exposed sites (P < 0.0001). The top 3 most frequent allergens in sunscreens were benzophenone-3 (70.2% for 10% concentration, 64.4% for 3% concentration), DL-alpha-tocopherol (4.8%), and fragrance mix I (4.0%). Less than 40% of positive patch test reactions were detected by the North American Contact Dermatitis Group screening series of 65 to 70 allergens. Conclusions: A supplemental antigen series is important in detecting allergy to sunscreens.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)176-182
Number of pages7
JournalDermatitis
Volume24
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 1 2013

Fingerprint

Sunscreening Agents
Patch Tests
Contact Dermatitis
Allergens
Hypersensitivity
Occupational Dermatitis
alpha-Tocopherol
Cross-Sectional Studies
Antigens

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Immunology and Allergy
  • Dermatology

Cite this

Warshaw, Erin M. ; Wang, Michael Z. ; Maibach, Howard I. ; Belsito, Donald V. ; Zug, Kathryn A. ; Taylor, James S. ; Toby Mathias, C. G. ; Sasseville, Denis ; Zirwas, Matthew J. ; Fowler, Joseph F. ; DeKoven, Joel G. ; Fransway, Anthony F. ; DeLeo, Vincent A. ; Marks, James ; Pratt, Melanie D. ; Storrs, Frances J. / Patch test reactions associated with sunscreen products and the importance of testing to an expanded series : Retrospective analysis of North American Contact Dermatitis Group data, 2001 to 2010. In: Dermatitis. 2013 ; Vol. 24, No. 4. pp. 176-182.
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title = "Patch test reactions associated with sunscreen products and the importance of testing to an expanded series: Retrospective analysis of North American Contact Dermatitis Group data, 2001 to 2010",
abstract = "Background: Both active and inactive ingredients in sunscreen may cause contact dermatitis. Objectives: This study aimed to describe allergens associated with a sunscreen source. Methods: A cross-sectional analysis of patients patch tested by the North American Contact Dermatitis Group between 2001 and 2010 was performed. Results: Of 23,908 patients patch tested, 219 (0.9{\%}) had sunscreen coded as an allergen source. Patients who were male, with occupational dermatitis, or older (older than 40 years) had significantly lower rates of allergic reactions to sunscreens; the most commonly affected areas were the face and exposed sites (P < 0.0001). The top 3 most frequent allergens in sunscreens were benzophenone-3 (70.2{\%} for 10{\%} concentration, 64.4{\%} for 3{\%} concentration), DL-alpha-tocopherol (4.8{\%}), and fragrance mix I (4.0{\%}). Less than 40{\%} of positive patch test reactions were detected by the North American Contact Dermatitis Group screening series of 65 to 70 allergens. Conclusions: A supplemental antigen series is important in detecting allergy to sunscreens.",
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Warshaw, EM, Wang, MZ, Maibach, HI, Belsito, DV, Zug, KA, Taylor, JS, Toby Mathias, CG, Sasseville, D, Zirwas, MJ, Fowler, JF, DeKoven, JG, Fransway, AF, DeLeo, VA, Marks, J, Pratt, MD & Storrs, FJ 2013, 'Patch test reactions associated with sunscreen products and the importance of testing to an expanded series: Retrospective analysis of North American Contact Dermatitis Group data, 2001 to 2010', Dermatitis, vol. 24, no. 4, pp. 176-182. https://doi.org/10.1097/DER.0b013e3182983845

Patch test reactions associated with sunscreen products and the importance of testing to an expanded series : Retrospective analysis of North American Contact Dermatitis Group data, 2001 to 2010. / Warshaw, Erin M.; Wang, Michael Z.; Maibach, Howard I.; Belsito, Donald V.; Zug, Kathryn A.; Taylor, James S.; Toby Mathias, C. G.; Sasseville, Denis; Zirwas, Matthew J.; Fowler, Joseph F.; DeKoven, Joel G.; Fransway, Anthony F.; DeLeo, Vincent A.; Marks, James; Pratt, Melanie D.; Storrs, Frances J.

In: Dermatitis, Vol. 24, No. 4, 01.07.2013, p. 176-182.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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T1 - Patch test reactions associated with sunscreen products and the importance of testing to an expanded series

T2 - Retrospective analysis of North American Contact Dermatitis Group data, 2001 to 2010

AU - Warshaw, Erin M.

AU - Wang, Michael Z.

AU - Maibach, Howard I.

AU - Belsito, Donald V.

AU - Zug, Kathryn A.

AU - Taylor, James S.

AU - Toby Mathias, C. G.

AU - Sasseville, Denis

AU - Zirwas, Matthew J.

AU - Fowler, Joseph F.

AU - DeKoven, Joel G.

AU - Fransway, Anthony F.

AU - DeLeo, Vincent A.

AU - Marks, James

AU - Pratt, Melanie D.

AU - Storrs, Frances J.

PY - 2013/7/1

Y1 - 2013/7/1

N2 - Background: Both active and inactive ingredients in sunscreen may cause contact dermatitis. Objectives: This study aimed to describe allergens associated with a sunscreen source. Methods: A cross-sectional analysis of patients patch tested by the North American Contact Dermatitis Group between 2001 and 2010 was performed. Results: Of 23,908 patients patch tested, 219 (0.9%) had sunscreen coded as an allergen source. Patients who were male, with occupational dermatitis, or older (older than 40 years) had significantly lower rates of allergic reactions to sunscreens; the most commonly affected areas were the face and exposed sites (P < 0.0001). The top 3 most frequent allergens in sunscreens were benzophenone-3 (70.2% for 10% concentration, 64.4% for 3% concentration), DL-alpha-tocopherol (4.8%), and fragrance mix I (4.0%). Less than 40% of positive patch test reactions were detected by the North American Contact Dermatitis Group screening series of 65 to 70 allergens. Conclusions: A supplemental antigen series is important in detecting allergy to sunscreens.

AB - Background: Both active and inactive ingredients in sunscreen may cause contact dermatitis. Objectives: This study aimed to describe allergens associated with a sunscreen source. Methods: A cross-sectional analysis of patients patch tested by the North American Contact Dermatitis Group between 2001 and 2010 was performed. Results: Of 23,908 patients patch tested, 219 (0.9%) had sunscreen coded as an allergen source. Patients who were male, with occupational dermatitis, or older (older than 40 years) had significantly lower rates of allergic reactions to sunscreens; the most commonly affected areas were the face and exposed sites (P < 0.0001). The top 3 most frequent allergens in sunscreens were benzophenone-3 (70.2% for 10% concentration, 64.4% for 3% concentration), DL-alpha-tocopherol (4.8%), and fragrance mix I (4.0%). Less than 40% of positive patch test reactions were detected by the North American Contact Dermatitis Group screening series of 65 to 70 allergens. Conclusions: A supplemental antigen series is important in detecting allergy to sunscreens.

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