Pathological left-handedness: A case report examining the developmental course of the syndrome following head trauma

Antolin Llorente, Paul Satz, Virdette L. Brumm, Linda M. Philpott

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The present case study examines, through longitudinal neuropsychological assessment over a time span of 3 years, the course of pathological left handedness in a 6-year, 2-month-old female. The case illustrates for the first time, in a data-based and time-delineated fashion, the pattern of changes that have been previously attributed to this syndrome including trophic alterations, abrupt shift in manual dominance, and probable interhemispheric reorganization detrimental to visual-spatial functions (crowding hypothesis). Theoretical and applied implications associated with the present findings are also addressed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)98-109
Number of pages12
JournalChild Neuropsychology
Volume4
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 22 1998

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Functional Laterality
Craniocerebral Trauma
Crowding

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Neuropsychology and Physiological Psychology
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology

Cite this

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Pathological left-handedness : A case report examining the developmental course of the syndrome following head trauma. / Llorente, Antolin; Satz, Paul; Brumm, Virdette L.; Philpott, Linda M.

In: Child Neuropsychology, Vol. 4, No. 2, 22.10.1998, p. 98-109.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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