Patient access to U.S. physicians who conduct internet or e-mail consults

Christopher Sciamanna, Michelle L. Rogers, Edmond D. Shenassa, Thomas K. Houston

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

20 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

BACKGROUND: E-mail communication has the potential to improve communication between patients and doctors. OBJECTIVE: The objective of the study is to describe the access of patients to physicians who conduct e-mail consults. METHODS: We analyzed data from the National Ambulatory Medical Care Survey (NAMCS), a nationally representative cross-sectional survey of office-based physician visits, in 2001, 2002, and 2003. The main outcome measure was the percentage of visits to a provider who reported doing internet or e-mail consults. RESULTS: There was fewer than 1 in 10 outpatient visits in 2001 (9.2%) to physicians who reported doing internet or e-mail consults, and this did not increase in 2002 (5.8%) or 2003 (5.5%). Access to these physicians was greater among patients who were male, nonminority, lived in the Western United States, seen for pre-/postoperative care, seen by a primary care provider, and not seen by a nurse during their visit. Access to physicians who conducted internet or e-mail consults was independent of other patient (e.g., chronic conditions), provider (e.g., office setting), and visit (e.g., medications prescribed) characteristics. CONCLUSIONS: Access to physicians who do internet or e-mail consults is generally low and did not increase between 2001 and 2003, despite growth in internet access and in other internet-related activities.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)378-381
Number of pages4
JournalJournal of general internal medicine
Volume22
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1 2007

Fingerprint

Postal Service
Internet
Physicians
Communication
Health Care Surveys
Office Visits
Physicians' Offices
Postoperative Care
Primary Health Care
Outpatients
Cross-Sectional Studies
Nurses
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Growth

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Internal Medicine

Cite this

Sciamanna, Christopher ; Rogers, Michelle L. ; Shenassa, Edmond D. ; Houston, Thomas K. / Patient access to U.S. physicians who conduct internet or e-mail consults. In: Journal of general internal medicine. 2007 ; Vol. 22, No. 3. pp. 378-381.
@article{49dbaf70ac4b4fe69cd569623720c519,
title = "Patient access to U.S. physicians who conduct internet or e-mail consults",
abstract = "BACKGROUND: E-mail communication has the potential to improve communication between patients and doctors. OBJECTIVE: The objective of the study is to describe the access of patients to physicians who conduct e-mail consults. METHODS: We analyzed data from the National Ambulatory Medical Care Survey (NAMCS), a nationally representative cross-sectional survey of office-based physician visits, in 2001, 2002, and 2003. The main outcome measure was the percentage of visits to a provider who reported doing internet or e-mail consults. RESULTS: There was fewer than 1 in 10 outpatient visits in 2001 (9.2{\%}) to physicians who reported doing internet or e-mail consults, and this did not increase in 2002 (5.8{\%}) or 2003 (5.5{\%}). Access to these physicians was greater among patients who were male, nonminority, lived in the Western United States, seen for pre-/postoperative care, seen by a primary care provider, and not seen by a nurse during their visit. Access to physicians who conducted internet or e-mail consults was independent of other patient (e.g., chronic conditions), provider (e.g., office setting), and visit (e.g., medications prescribed) characteristics. CONCLUSIONS: Access to physicians who do internet or e-mail consults is generally low and did not increase between 2001 and 2003, despite growth in internet access and in other internet-related activities.",
author = "Christopher Sciamanna and Rogers, {Michelle L.} and Shenassa, {Edmond D.} and Houston, {Thomas K.}",
year = "2007",
month = "3",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1007/s11606-006-0076-1",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "22",
pages = "378--381",
journal = "Journal of General Internal Medicine",
issn = "0884-8734",
publisher = "Springer New York",
number = "3",

}

Patient access to U.S. physicians who conduct internet or e-mail consults. / Sciamanna, Christopher; Rogers, Michelle L.; Shenassa, Edmond D.; Houston, Thomas K.

In: Journal of general internal medicine, Vol. 22, No. 3, 01.03.2007, p. 378-381.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Patient access to U.S. physicians who conduct internet or e-mail consults

AU - Sciamanna, Christopher

AU - Rogers, Michelle L.

AU - Shenassa, Edmond D.

AU - Houston, Thomas K.

PY - 2007/3/1

Y1 - 2007/3/1

N2 - BACKGROUND: E-mail communication has the potential to improve communication between patients and doctors. OBJECTIVE: The objective of the study is to describe the access of patients to physicians who conduct e-mail consults. METHODS: We analyzed data from the National Ambulatory Medical Care Survey (NAMCS), a nationally representative cross-sectional survey of office-based physician visits, in 2001, 2002, and 2003. The main outcome measure was the percentage of visits to a provider who reported doing internet or e-mail consults. RESULTS: There was fewer than 1 in 10 outpatient visits in 2001 (9.2%) to physicians who reported doing internet or e-mail consults, and this did not increase in 2002 (5.8%) or 2003 (5.5%). Access to these physicians was greater among patients who were male, nonminority, lived in the Western United States, seen for pre-/postoperative care, seen by a primary care provider, and not seen by a nurse during their visit. Access to physicians who conducted internet or e-mail consults was independent of other patient (e.g., chronic conditions), provider (e.g., office setting), and visit (e.g., medications prescribed) characteristics. CONCLUSIONS: Access to physicians who do internet or e-mail consults is generally low and did not increase between 2001 and 2003, despite growth in internet access and in other internet-related activities.

AB - BACKGROUND: E-mail communication has the potential to improve communication between patients and doctors. OBJECTIVE: The objective of the study is to describe the access of patients to physicians who conduct e-mail consults. METHODS: We analyzed data from the National Ambulatory Medical Care Survey (NAMCS), a nationally representative cross-sectional survey of office-based physician visits, in 2001, 2002, and 2003. The main outcome measure was the percentage of visits to a provider who reported doing internet or e-mail consults. RESULTS: There was fewer than 1 in 10 outpatient visits in 2001 (9.2%) to physicians who reported doing internet or e-mail consults, and this did not increase in 2002 (5.8%) or 2003 (5.5%). Access to these physicians was greater among patients who were male, nonminority, lived in the Western United States, seen for pre-/postoperative care, seen by a primary care provider, and not seen by a nurse during their visit. Access to physicians who conducted internet or e-mail consults was independent of other patient (e.g., chronic conditions), provider (e.g., office setting), and visit (e.g., medications prescribed) characteristics. CONCLUSIONS: Access to physicians who do internet or e-mail consults is generally low and did not increase between 2001 and 2003, despite growth in internet access and in other internet-related activities.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=34250337358&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=34250337358&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1007/s11606-006-0076-1

DO - 10.1007/s11606-006-0076-1

M3 - Article

C2 - 17356972

AN - SCOPUS:34250337358

VL - 22

SP - 378

EP - 381

JO - Journal of General Internal Medicine

JF - Journal of General Internal Medicine

SN - 0884-8734

IS - 3

ER -