Patient Discomfort and Resident Confidence After Knee Intra-articular Injection Simulation Training: A Randomized Control Trial Study

Adae O. Amoako, George G.A. Pujalte, Neha Kaushik, Timothy Riley

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

1 Scopus citations

Abstract

Teaching primary care providers how to perform musculoskeletal procedures has become increasingly important as more and more patients with orthopedic conditions present in primary care clinics. This study aims to evaluate whether targeted simulation model training in residency can increase residents’ comfort level in performing intra-articular knee injections and decrease the pain of the procedure, as reported by patients injected. Residents were randomized into intervention and control groups. The comfort level of the residents as well as the pain levels from the procedures, as reported by patients, was recorded. The mean comfort level for the intervention group was 1.2, compared with that in the control group, which was 2.13; P value was.047. The mean pain level in the intervention group was 1.8, whereas in the control group was 3.63; P value was.156. Simulation training may boost residents’ comfort level, but not necessarily decrease patient discomfort during intra-articular knee injections.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalClinical Medicine Insights: Arthritis and Musculoskeletal Disorders
Volume11
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 6 2018

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Immunology and Allergy
  • Rheumatology

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