Patients’ Reported Usage of Weight Management Skills Following Bariatric Surgery

Jamal Essayli, Caitlin A. LaGrotte, Erin Leigh Miller, Andrea Rigby

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Little is known about which specific weight management skills bariatric patients find most and least valuable. Participants completed a measure assessing their usage of weight management skills at a follow-up appointment one or more years after undergoing bariatric surgery. Decreased usage of skills was associated with unsuccessful weight outcome, defined as losing less than 50% of excess weight, as well as weight regain. Weighing regularly was the skill selected most often by successful participants as helpful, and was chosen by a significantly smaller percentage of unsuccessful participants and those who regained a clinically significant amount of weight. A majority of both successful and unsuccessful participants indicated that they had discontinued food journaling. Weighing regularly may be perceived as a more useful method of self-monitoring.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)584-588
Number of pages5
JournalObesity Surgery
Volume28
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 1 2018

Fingerprint

Bariatric Surgery
Weights and Measures
Bariatrics
Appointments and Schedules
Food

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Surgery
  • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism
  • Nutrition and Dietetics

Cite this

Essayli, Jamal ; LaGrotte, Caitlin A. ; Miller, Erin Leigh ; Rigby, Andrea. / Patients’ Reported Usage of Weight Management Skills Following Bariatric Surgery. In: Obesity Surgery. 2018 ; Vol. 28, No. 2. pp. 584-588.
@article{fa3ee1d645584b20afb060a8c3b99fc6,
title = "Patients’ Reported Usage of Weight Management Skills Following Bariatric Surgery",
abstract = "Little is known about which specific weight management skills bariatric patients find most and least valuable. Participants completed a measure assessing their usage of weight management skills at a follow-up appointment one or more years after undergoing bariatric surgery. Decreased usage of skills was associated with unsuccessful weight outcome, defined as losing less than 50{\%} of excess weight, as well as weight regain. Weighing regularly was the skill selected most often by successful participants as helpful, and was chosen by a significantly smaller percentage of unsuccessful participants and those who regained a clinically significant amount of weight. A majority of both successful and unsuccessful participants indicated that they had discontinued food journaling. Weighing regularly may be perceived as a more useful method of self-monitoring.",
author = "Jamal Essayli and LaGrotte, {Caitlin A.} and Miller, {Erin Leigh} and Andrea Rigby",
year = "2018",
month = "2",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1007/s11695-017-3019-5",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "28",
pages = "584--588",
journal = "Obesity Surgery",
issn = "0960-8923",
publisher = "Springer New York",
number = "2",

}

Patients’ Reported Usage of Weight Management Skills Following Bariatric Surgery. / Essayli, Jamal; LaGrotte, Caitlin A.; Miller, Erin Leigh; Rigby, Andrea.

In: Obesity Surgery, Vol. 28, No. 2, 01.02.2018, p. 584-588.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Patients’ Reported Usage of Weight Management Skills Following Bariatric Surgery

AU - Essayli, Jamal

AU - LaGrotte, Caitlin A.

AU - Miller, Erin Leigh

AU - Rigby, Andrea

PY - 2018/2/1

Y1 - 2018/2/1

N2 - Little is known about which specific weight management skills bariatric patients find most and least valuable. Participants completed a measure assessing their usage of weight management skills at a follow-up appointment one or more years after undergoing bariatric surgery. Decreased usage of skills was associated with unsuccessful weight outcome, defined as losing less than 50% of excess weight, as well as weight regain. Weighing regularly was the skill selected most often by successful participants as helpful, and was chosen by a significantly smaller percentage of unsuccessful participants and those who regained a clinically significant amount of weight. A majority of both successful and unsuccessful participants indicated that they had discontinued food journaling. Weighing regularly may be perceived as a more useful method of self-monitoring.

AB - Little is known about which specific weight management skills bariatric patients find most and least valuable. Participants completed a measure assessing their usage of weight management skills at a follow-up appointment one or more years after undergoing bariatric surgery. Decreased usage of skills was associated with unsuccessful weight outcome, defined as losing less than 50% of excess weight, as well as weight regain. Weighing regularly was the skill selected most often by successful participants as helpful, and was chosen by a significantly smaller percentage of unsuccessful participants and those who regained a clinically significant amount of weight. A majority of both successful and unsuccessful participants indicated that they had discontinued food journaling. Weighing regularly may be perceived as a more useful method of self-monitoring.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85034777650&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85034777650&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1007/s11695-017-3019-5

DO - 10.1007/s11695-017-3019-5

M3 - Article

C2 - 29170859

AN - SCOPUS:85034777650

VL - 28

SP - 584

EP - 588

JO - Obesity Surgery

JF - Obesity Surgery

SN - 0960-8923

IS - 2

ER -