Patients With Peripheral Arterial Disease With Exaggerated Pressor Response Have Greater Ambulatory Dysfunction Than Patients With Lower Pressor Response

Danielle Jin Kwang Kim, Polly S. Montgomery, Ming Wang, Biyi Shen, Marcos Kuroki, Andrew W. Gardner

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

We determined whether patients with peripheral arterial disease (PAD) who have either an exaggerated or a negative pressor response during treadmill walking have shorter peak walking time (PWT) and claudication onset time (COT) than patients with a normal pressor response, independent of comorbid conditions. A total of 249 patients were categorized to 1 of 3 groups based on systolic blood pressure (SBP) responses at 2 minutes of treadmill walking (speed = 2 mph, grade = 0%): group 1 (negative pressor response, SBP < 0 mm Hg), group 2 (normal pressor response, SBP 18 mm Hg), and group 3 (exaggerated pressor response, SBP > 18 mm Hg). After adjusting for comorbid conditions, group 3 (exaggerated) had significantly reduced COT (P =.011) and PWT (P =.002) compared to group 2 (normal), while group 1 (negative) and group 2 (normal) were not different. Patients with symptomatic PAD with an increase in SBP > 18 mm Hg after 2 minutes of treadmill walking experience claudication earlier and thus have greater ambulatory dysfunction, compared to patients with PAD with a normal pressor response, whereas patients with PAD with negative pressor response had a similar walking performance. The implication is that the magnitude of pressor response to only 2 minutes of treadmill walking can partially explain the degree of ambulatory dysfunction in patients with PAD.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)747-753
Number of pages7
JournalAngiology
Volume71
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 1 2020

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

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