PCARE @10: Reflecting on a decade of prison communication, activism, research, and education, while looking ahead to new challenges and opportunities

PCARE

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Drafted a decade after the publication of our inaugural collectively authored essay, the members of the Prison Communication, Activism, Research, and Education collective (PCARE) reflect in this article on recent shifts in criminal justice policy and public discourse regarding the carceral state. Noting a growing consensus regarding the need to reduce national incarceration rates, as well as proliferating discussion regarding police brutality and other forms of state violence, the members of PCARE advocate an orientation of nonreformist reformism when addressing the current climate. Noting that many contemporary developments regarding prisons and policing are promising, we also argue that the prison-industrial complex remains a powerful and violent force in civil society. We begin by describing the complex coalitions that have emerged around prison reform in recent years, claiming that we should temper our enthusiasm for these developments with skepticism informed by a commitment to prison abolition. We then proceed to describe recent developments and tensions related to prison pedagogy, race, and the carceral state, and the gendered politics of policing and mass incarceration. We conclude with a call for critical communication scholars to engage in communication activism with a spirit of nonreformist reform and to humbly learn from the voices and experiences of those communities most directly impacted by the prison-industrial complex. We follow this essay with a response essay drafted by a collective of incarcerated individuals.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)288-310
Number of pages23
JournalCommunication and Critical/ Cultural Studies
Volume14
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 3 2017

Fingerprint

collective education
Prisons
communication research
correctional institution
Education
Communication
education
reformism
criminal justice policy
reform
communication
Law enforcement
coalition
civil society
police

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Cultural Studies
  • Communication

Cite this

@article{925a99bc81b84f42b0220a165dbfa46c,
title = "PCARE @10: Reflecting on a decade of prison communication, activism, research, and education, while looking ahead to new challenges and opportunities",
abstract = "Drafted a decade after the publication of our inaugural collectively authored essay, the members of the Prison Communication, Activism, Research, and Education collective (PCARE) reflect in this article on recent shifts in criminal justice policy and public discourse regarding the carceral state. Noting a growing consensus regarding the need to reduce national incarceration rates, as well as proliferating discussion regarding police brutality and other forms of state violence, the members of PCARE advocate an orientation of nonreformist reformism when addressing the current climate. Noting that many contemporary developments regarding prisons and policing are promising, we also argue that the prison-industrial complex remains a powerful and violent force in civil society. We begin by describing the complex coalitions that have emerged around prison reform in recent years, claiming that we should temper our enthusiasm for these developments with skepticism informed by a commitment to prison abolition. We then proceed to describe recent developments and tensions related to prison pedagogy, race, and the carceral state, and the gendered politics of policing and mass incarceration. We conclude with a call for critical communication scholars to engage in communication activism with a spirit of nonreformist reform and to humbly learn from the voices and experiences of those communities most directly impacted by the prison-industrial complex. We follow this essay with a response essay drafted by a collective of incarcerated individuals.",
author = "PCARE and Badger, {L. C.} and Hartnett, {Stephen John} and Hinck, {Edward A.} and Shellyschaefer Hinck and McCann, {Bryan J.} and Kathleen McConnell and Eleanor Novek and Emily Plec and Jennifer Wood and Bill Yousman",
year = "2017",
month = "7",
day = "3",
doi = "10.1080/14791420.2017.1345577",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "14",
pages = "288--310",
journal = "Communication and Critical/ Cultural Studies",
issn = "1479-1420",
publisher = "Routledge",
number = "3",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - PCARE @10

T2 - Reflecting on a decade of prison communication, activism, research, and education, while looking ahead to new challenges and opportunities

AU - PCARE

AU - Badger, L. C.

AU - Hartnett, Stephen John

AU - Hinck, Edward A.

AU - Hinck, Shellyschaefer

AU - McCann, Bryan J.

AU - McConnell, Kathleen

AU - Novek, Eleanor

AU - Plec, Emily

AU - Wood, Jennifer

AU - Yousman, Bill

PY - 2017/7/3

Y1 - 2017/7/3

N2 - Drafted a decade after the publication of our inaugural collectively authored essay, the members of the Prison Communication, Activism, Research, and Education collective (PCARE) reflect in this article on recent shifts in criminal justice policy and public discourse regarding the carceral state. Noting a growing consensus regarding the need to reduce national incarceration rates, as well as proliferating discussion regarding police brutality and other forms of state violence, the members of PCARE advocate an orientation of nonreformist reformism when addressing the current climate. Noting that many contemporary developments regarding prisons and policing are promising, we also argue that the prison-industrial complex remains a powerful and violent force in civil society. We begin by describing the complex coalitions that have emerged around prison reform in recent years, claiming that we should temper our enthusiasm for these developments with skepticism informed by a commitment to prison abolition. We then proceed to describe recent developments and tensions related to prison pedagogy, race, and the carceral state, and the gendered politics of policing and mass incarceration. We conclude with a call for critical communication scholars to engage in communication activism with a spirit of nonreformist reform and to humbly learn from the voices and experiences of those communities most directly impacted by the prison-industrial complex. We follow this essay with a response essay drafted by a collective of incarcerated individuals.

AB - Drafted a decade after the publication of our inaugural collectively authored essay, the members of the Prison Communication, Activism, Research, and Education collective (PCARE) reflect in this article on recent shifts in criminal justice policy and public discourse regarding the carceral state. Noting a growing consensus regarding the need to reduce national incarceration rates, as well as proliferating discussion regarding police brutality and other forms of state violence, the members of PCARE advocate an orientation of nonreformist reformism when addressing the current climate. Noting that many contemporary developments regarding prisons and policing are promising, we also argue that the prison-industrial complex remains a powerful and violent force in civil society. We begin by describing the complex coalitions that have emerged around prison reform in recent years, claiming that we should temper our enthusiasm for these developments with skepticism informed by a commitment to prison abolition. We then proceed to describe recent developments and tensions related to prison pedagogy, race, and the carceral state, and the gendered politics of policing and mass incarceration. We conclude with a call for critical communication scholars to engage in communication activism with a spirit of nonreformist reform and to humbly learn from the voices and experiences of those communities most directly impacted by the prison-industrial complex. We follow this essay with a response essay drafted by a collective of incarcerated individuals.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85025135247&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85025135247&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1080/14791420.2017.1345577

DO - 10.1080/14791420.2017.1345577

M3 - Article

AN - SCOPUS:85025135247

VL - 14

SP - 288

EP - 310

JO - Communication and Critical/ Cultural Studies

JF - Communication and Critical/ Cultural Studies

SN - 1479-1420

IS - 3

ER -