Pediatric ATV injuries in a statewide sample: 2004 to 2014

Mariano Garay, Joseph Hess, Douglas Armstrong, William Hennrikus

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

OBJECTIVES: To establish the incidence, mortality rate, and fracture location of pediatric patients injured while using an all-terrain vehicle (ATV) over an 11-year period. METHODS: A retrospective study using a state trauma database for patients ages 0 to 17 years who sustained injuries while using an ATV. Thirty-two pediatric and adult trauma centers within the state were evaluated from January 1, 2004, to December 31, 2014. RESULTS: The inclusion criteria were met by 1912 patients. The estimated mean annual incidence during the period of the study was 6.2 patients per 100 000 children in the pediatric population <18 years of age. There was a decrease of 13.4% in the mean incidence when comparing the first 5 years of the study with the last 6 years. The median age of patients was 14 years. The median hospital length of stay and injury severity score were 3 days and 9, respectively. There were 28 fatalities (1.5%). The mean mortality incidence was 0.09 deaths per 100 000 children and remained relatively constant. The majority of patients (55.4%) sustained at least 1 bone fracture at or below the cervical spine. The femur and tibia were more commonly fractured (21.6% and 17.7% of the patients, respectively). CONCLUSIONS: Despite current guidelines by the American Academy of Pediatrics, patients younger than 16 years of age remain victims of ATV injuries. Although there was a 13.4% reduction in the incidence of ATV-related injuries in recent years, continued preventive guidelines are still necessary to avert these injuries in children and adolescents.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article numbere20170945
JournalPediatrics
Volume140
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 1 2017

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Off-Road Motor Vehicles
Pediatrics
Wounds and Injuries
Incidence
Length of Stay
Guidelines
Injury Severity Score
Mortality
Trauma Centers
Bone Fractures
Tibia
Femur
Spine
Retrospective Studies
Databases

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health

Cite this

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title = "Pediatric ATV injuries in a statewide sample: 2004 to 2014",
abstract = "OBJECTIVES: To establish the incidence, mortality rate, and fracture location of pediatric patients injured while using an all-terrain vehicle (ATV) over an 11-year period. METHODS: A retrospective study using a state trauma database for patients ages 0 to 17 years who sustained injuries while using an ATV. Thirty-two pediatric and adult trauma centers within the state were evaluated from January 1, 2004, to December 31, 2014. RESULTS: The inclusion criteria were met by 1912 patients. The estimated mean annual incidence during the period of the study was 6.2 patients per 100 000 children in the pediatric population <18 years of age. There was a decrease of 13.4{\%} in the mean incidence when comparing the first 5 years of the study with the last 6 years. The median age of patients was 14 years. The median hospital length of stay and injury severity score were 3 days and 9, respectively. There were 28 fatalities (1.5{\%}). The mean mortality incidence was 0.09 deaths per 100 000 children and remained relatively constant. The majority of patients (55.4{\%}) sustained at least 1 bone fracture at or below the cervical spine. The femur and tibia were more commonly fractured (21.6{\%} and 17.7{\%} of the patients, respectively). CONCLUSIONS: Despite current guidelines by the American Academy of Pediatrics, patients younger than 16 years of age remain victims of ATV injuries. Although there was a 13.4{\%} reduction in the incidence of ATV-related injuries in recent years, continued preventive guidelines are still necessary to avert these injuries in children and adolescents.",
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Pediatric ATV injuries in a statewide sample : 2004 to 2014. / Garay, Mariano; Hess, Joseph; Armstrong, Douglas; Hennrikus, William.

In: Pediatrics, Vol. 140, No. 2, e20170945, 01.08.2017.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

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AU - Hess, Joseph

AU - Armstrong, Douglas

AU - Hennrikus, William

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N2 - OBJECTIVES: To establish the incidence, mortality rate, and fracture location of pediatric patients injured while using an all-terrain vehicle (ATV) over an 11-year period. METHODS: A retrospective study using a state trauma database for patients ages 0 to 17 years who sustained injuries while using an ATV. Thirty-two pediatric and adult trauma centers within the state were evaluated from January 1, 2004, to December 31, 2014. RESULTS: The inclusion criteria were met by 1912 patients. The estimated mean annual incidence during the period of the study was 6.2 patients per 100 000 children in the pediatric population <18 years of age. There was a decrease of 13.4% in the mean incidence when comparing the first 5 years of the study with the last 6 years. The median age of patients was 14 years. The median hospital length of stay and injury severity score were 3 days and 9, respectively. There were 28 fatalities (1.5%). The mean mortality incidence was 0.09 deaths per 100 000 children and remained relatively constant. The majority of patients (55.4%) sustained at least 1 bone fracture at or below the cervical spine. The femur and tibia were more commonly fractured (21.6% and 17.7% of the patients, respectively). CONCLUSIONS: Despite current guidelines by the American Academy of Pediatrics, patients younger than 16 years of age remain victims of ATV injuries. Although there was a 13.4% reduction in the incidence of ATV-related injuries in recent years, continued preventive guidelines are still necessary to avert these injuries in children and adolescents.

AB - OBJECTIVES: To establish the incidence, mortality rate, and fracture location of pediatric patients injured while using an all-terrain vehicle (ATV) over an 11-year period. METHODS: A retrospective study using a state trauma database for patients ages 0 to 17 years who sustained injuries while using an ATV. Thirty-two pediatric and adult trauma centers within the state were evaluated from January 1, 2004, to December 31, 2014. RESULTS: The inclusion criteria were met by 1912 patients. The estimated mean annual incidence during the period of the study was 6.2 patients per 100 000 children in the pediatric population <18 years of age. There was a decrease of 13.4% in the mean incidence when comparing the first 5 years of the study with the last 6 years. The median age of patients was 14 years. The median hospital length of stay and injury severity score were 3 days and 9, respectively. There were 28 fatalities (1.5%). The mean mortality incidence was 0.09 deaths per 100 000 children and remained relatively constant. The majority of patients (55.4%) sustained at least 1 bone fracture at or below the cervical spine. The femur and tibia were more commonly fractured (21.6% and 17.7% of the patients, respectively). CONCLUSIONS: Despite current guidelines by the American Academy of Pediatrics, patients younger than 16 years of age remain victims of ATV injuries. Although there was a 13.4% reduction in the incidence of ATV-related injuries in recent years, continued preventive guidelines are still necessary to avert these injuries in children and adolescents.

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