Pediatric obesity and depression: A cross-sectional analysis of absolute BMI as it relates to children's depression index scores in obese 7- to 17-year-old children

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Abstract

Depression and obesity are important in children because they affect health in childhood and later life. The exact relationship between obesity and depression, especially in children, remains undefined. Patients and methods. Using a cross-sectional chart review design, our study looked at a weight management clinic-based sample of 117 obese children, 7 to 17 years old, to determine the relationship between absolute BMI and depression as measured by the Children's Depression Index (CDI) while accounting for confounders, such as the child's medical problems, physical activity, and family structure. Results. There was no correlation between depression as measured by the CDI and increasing BMI in obese children seeking weight management. However, we did demonstrate a positive correlation between depression and paternal absence and daily television/computer/video game time. Conclusions: Clinicians should encourage decreasing screen time and might consider family therapy for obese children in families that lack paternal involvement.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)24-29
Number of pages6
JournalClinical Pediatrics
Volume52
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2013

Fingerprint

Pediatric Obesity
Cross-Sectional Studies
Depression
Video Games
Obesity
Weights and Measures
Family Therapy
Television
Exercise
Health

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health

Cite this

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abstract = "Depression and obesity are important in children because they affect health in childhood and later life. The exact relationship between obesity and depression, especially in children, remains undefined. Patients and methods. Using a cross-sectional chart review design, our study looked at a weight management clinic-based sample of 117 obese children, 7 to 17 years old, to determine the relationship between absolute BMI and depression as measured by the Children's Depression Index (CDI) while accounting for confounders, such as the child's medical problems, physical activity, and family structure. Results. There was no correlation between depression as measured by the CDI and increasing BMI in obese children seeking weight management. However, we did demonstrate a positive correlation between depression and paternal absence and daily television/computer/video game time. Conclusions: Clinicians should encourage decreasing screen time and might consider family therapy for obese children in families that lack paternal involvement.",
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