Pedometry to prevent cardiorespiratory fitness decline-is it effective?

Robert M. Lystrup, Gordon F. West, Cara Olsen, Matthew Ward, Mark Stephens

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Introduction: Physically active providers are more likely to prescribe exercise. Unfortunately, many become sedentary during their training. We examined pedometry as an incentive to promote physical activity in a cohort of medical students. Methods: This was a prospective, unblinded clinical trial of pedometry. 107 preclinical medical students volunteered. 50 students received Fitbit pedometers and 57 served as controls. All students ran 1.5- or 2-mile timed runs before pedometer issue, and again 1 year after. Change in run times were the primary outcome measure. Step counts, body composition, and exercise frequency were secondary outcomes. Results: 76% of students with pedometers reported increased motivation to exercise and 57% reported changing daily routines as a result of pedometry. Active pedometry participants declined from 48/50 initially to 22/50 over 13 months. Run times slowed an average of 5.0 seconds for pedometry users vs. 12.3 seconds for the control group. This difference was not statistically significant (p = 0.48). Conclusions: A subset of future physicians reported increased motivation to exercise after a trial of pedometry. However, adherence over the long term was poor and it seems to have a limited impact on aerobic exercise performance in this population.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1235-1239
Number of pages5
JournalMilitary Medicine
Volume181
Issue number10
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1 2016

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Exercise
Motivation
Students
Medical Students
Body Composition
Cardiorespiratory Fitness
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Clinical Trials
Physicians
Control Groups
Population

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

Lystrup, Robert M. ; West, Gordon F. ; Olsen, Cara ; Ward, Matthew ; Stephens, Mark. / Pedometry to prevent cardiorespiratory fitness decline-is it effective?. In: Military Medicine. 2016 ; Vol. 181, No. 10. pp. 1235-1239.
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Pedometry to prevent cardiorespiratory fitness decline-is it effective? / Lystrup, Robert M.; West, Gordon F.; Olsen, Cara; Ward, Matthew; Stephens, Mark.

In: Military Medicine, Vol. 181, No. 10, 01.10.2016, p. 1235-1239.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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