Peer experience: Common and unique features of number of friendships, social network centrality, and sociometric status

Scott D. Gest, Sandra A. Graham-Bermann, Willard W. Hartup

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

197 Scopus citations

Abstract

Three conceptually distinct dimensions of classroom social position (number of mutual friendships, social network centrality, and sociometric status) were examined in relation to each other and to peer-nominated behavioral reputation among 205 7-and 8-year old children. There were moderate correlations in children's standing across the three dimensions, but categorical analyses underscored the limits to these associations (e.g., 39% of Rejected children had at least one mutual friendship; 31% of Popular children did not). Each dimension was associated with a distinct profile of peer-nominated social behavior and, in multiple regression analyses, accounted for unique variance in peer-nominated behaviors. Number of friendships was uniquely associated with prosocial skills; network centrality was uniquely associated with both prosocial and antisocial behavioral styles; and being disliked was uniquely associated with the full range of social behaviors. Results provide empirical validation for the conceptual distinctions among number of reciprocated friendships, social network centrality and being liked or disliked.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)23-40
Number of pages18
JournalSocial Development
Volume10
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - 2001

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Developmental and Educational Psychology
  • Sociology and Political Science
  • Social Sciences (miscellaneous)

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