Peer influences on academic motivation

Exploring multiple methods of assessing youths' most "Influential" peer relationships

Lauren E. Molloy, Scott David Gest, Kelly L. Rulison

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

44 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The present study examines the relative role of three distinct types of peer relationships (reciprocated friendships, frequent interactions, and shared group membership) in within-year changes in academic self-concept and engagement before and after the transition to middle school (fifth and seventh grade). In a series of linear regression analyses, main effects of each peer type's academic self-concept and engagement on changes in youths' academic characteristics were used to test socialization processes. Interactions of youths' academic skills with those of each peer type were used to test social comparison processes influencing changes in academic self-concept. Results suggest unique roles of each peer relationship differentially influencing changes in youths' academic adjustment as well as stronger influence effects during seventh than fifth grade. Implications are discussed in terms of distinct influence processes associated with each peer relationship type as well as potential developmental differences in the role that certain peer relationships play.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)13-40
Number of pages28
JournalJournal of Early Adolescence
Volume31
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 1 2011

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self-concept
Self Concept
school grade
Social Adjustment
Socialization
interaction
group membership
friendship
socialization
Linear Models
Regression Analysis
regression
Peer Influence

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Developmental and Educational Psychology
  • Social Sciences (miscellaneous)
  • Sociology and Political Science
  • Life-span and Life-course Studies

Cite this

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Peer influences on academic motivation : Exploring multiple methods of assessing youths' most "Influential" peer relationships. / Molloy, Lauren E.; Gest, Scott David; Rulison, Kelly L.

In: Journal of Early Adolescence, Vol. 31, No. 1, 01.02.2011, p. 13-40.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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