Peer Victimization Exposure and Subsequent Substance Use in Early Adolescence: The Role of Sleep Problems

Övgü Kaynak, Christopher R. Whipple, Wendy L. Kliewer, Stephen J. Lepore

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

While sleep problems are positively associated with both peer victimization and substance use, previous studies largely have ignored the indirect role sleep problems may play in this association. This three-wave longitudinal study aimed to determine whether sleep problems might link peer victimization to subsequent substance use. Participants were 986 youth (53.7% female, Mage = 12.32 [SD = 0.54 years], 55.6% White, 24.4% Latinx, 22.8% African American/Black, 11.1% Multiracial/Multiethnic, 13.4% Asian/Pacific Islander, and 6.4% Native American) from three U.S. public middle schools. A structural equation model controlling for multiple potential confounds revealed an indirect effect of peer victimization on substance use through sleep problems. Multiple group analyses indicated that the indirect effect was larger for females than for males. Effects did not differ across school socioeconomic level. The results provide further support to include peer victimization when considering factors that may influence adolescent sleep issues and subsequent substance use.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalJournal of youth and adolescence
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - 2021

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Social Psychology
  • Education
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology
  • Social Sciences (miscellaneous)

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