Penn state futuretruck hybrid electric vehicle

Light-duty diesel exhaust emission control system to meet ULEV emissions standard

Elana Chapman, Scott Pflumm, Eugene Kung, Ragini Acharya, Jeffrey Saxon, Brian Feldman, Brian Herrold, Keith Wilson, Peyman Safabakhsh, Matt Shirk, Jonathan Caserta, André Boehman, Daniel Connell Haworth, Hibiki Koga, Ted Tadros, Don Maglast, Larry Blackman

Research output: Contribution to conferencePaper

Abstract

Two of the goals of the Penn State FutureTruck project were to reduce the emissions of the hybrid electric Ford Explorer to ULEV or lower, and improve the fuel economy by 25% over the stock vehicle. The hybrid electric vehicle system is powered with a 103kW 2.5L Detroit Diesel engine which operates with a fuel blend consisting of ultra-low-sulfur diesel and biodiesel (35%). Lower emissions are inherently achieved by the use of biodiesel. Additionally, the engine was fitted with a series of aftertreatment devices in an effort to achieve the low emissions standards. Vehicle testing has shown a gasoline-equivalent fuel economy improvement of approximately 22%, a reduction in greenhouse gas emissions by approximately 38%, and meeting or exceeding stock emissions numbers in all other categories through the use of an advanced catalyst and control strategy. This paper will review the engine and emissions system strategy to meet the low emissions standards, detail the operation of the aftertreatment system, detail the process by which it was tested in an engine dyno lab and chassis dyno lab, and review the control optimization. Most importantly, the data will suggest what further optimization would need to be completed to meet lower emissions standards. Finally, this paper suggests some further research and questions to be answered in preparing and optimizing an aftertreatment system for a light-duty diesel engine. Figure 1The Penn State University Hybrid-Electric Ford Explorer, the "Wattmuncher". [1]

Original languageEnglish (US)
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2005
EventPowertrain and Fluid Systems Conference and Exhibition - San Antonio, TX, United States
Duration: Oct 24 2005Oct 27 2005

Other

OtherPowertrain and Fluid Systems Conference and Exhibition
CountryUnited States
CitySan Antonio, TX
Period10/24/0510/27/05

Fingerprint

Emission control
Hybrid vehicles
Fuel economy
Biodiesel
Engines
Control systems
Diesel engines
Chassis
Gas emissions
Greenhouse gases
Gasoline
Sulfur
Catalysts
Testing

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Automotive Engineering
  • Safety, Risk, Reliability and Quality
  • Pollution
  • Industrial and Manufacturing Engineering

Cite this

Chapman, E., Pflumm, S., Kung, E., Acharya, R., Saxon, J., Feldman, B., ... Blackman, L. (2005). Penn state futuretruck hybrid electric vehicle: Light-duty diesel exhaust emission control system to meet ULEV emissions standard. Paper presented at Powertrain and Fluid Systems Conference and Exhibition, San Antonio, TX, United States. https://doi.org/10.4271/2005-01-3877
Chapman, Elana ; Pflumm, Scott ; Kung, Eugene ; Acharya, Ragini ; Saxon, Jeffrey ; Feldman, Brian ; Herrold, Brian ; Wilson, Keith ; Safabakhsh, Peyman ; Shirk, Matt ; Caserta, Jonathan ; Boehman, André ; Haworth, Daniel Connell ; Koga, Hibiki ; Tadros, Ted ; Maglast, Don ; Blackman, Larry. / Penn state futuretruck hybrid electric vehicle : Light-duty diesel exhaust emission control system to meet ULEV emissions standard. Paper presented at Powertrain and Fluid Systems Conference and Exhibition, San Antonio, TX, United States.
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abstract = "Two of the goals of the Penn State FutureTruck project were to reduce the emissions of the hybrid electric Ford Explorer to ULEV or lower, and improve the fuel economy by 25{\%} over the stock vehicle. The hybrid electric vehicle system is powered with a 103kW 2.5L Detroit Diesel engine which operates with a fuel blend consisting of ultra-low-sulfur diesel and biodiesel (35{\%}). Lower emissions are inherently achieved by the use of biodiesel. Additionally, the engine was fitted with a series of aftertreatment devices in an effort to achieve the low emissions standards. Vehicle testing has shown a gasoline-equivalent fuel economy improvement of approximately 22{\%}, a reduction in greenhouse gas emissions by approximately 38{\%}, and meeting or exceeding stock emissions numbers in all other categories through the use of an advanced catalyst and control strategy. This paper will review the engine and emissions system strategy to meet the low emissions standards, detail the operation of the aftertreatment system, detail the process by which it was tested in an engine dyno lab and chassis dyno lab, and review the control optimization. Most importantly, the data will suggest what further optimization would need to be completed to meet lower emissions standards. Finally, this paper suggests some further research and questions to be answered in preparing and optimizing an aftertreatment system for a light-duty diesel engine. Figure 1The Penn State University Hybrid-Electric Ford Explorer, the {"}Wattmuncher{"}. [1]",
author = "Elana Chapman and Scott Pflumm and Eugene Kung and Ragini Acharya and Jeffrey Saxon and Brian Feldman and Brian Herrold and Keith Wilson and Peyman Safabakhsh and Matt Shirk and Jonathan Caserta and Andr{\'e} Boehman and Haworth, {Daniel Connell} and Hibiki Koga and Ted Tadros and Don Maglast and Larry Blackman",
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Chapman, E, Pflumm, S, Kung, E, Acharya, R, Saxon, J, Feldman, B, Herrold, B, Wilson, K, Safabakhsh, P, Shirk, M, Caserta, J, Boehman, A, Haworth, DC, Koga, H, Tadros, T, Maglast, D & Blackman, L 2005, 'Penn state futuretruck hybrid electric vehicle: Light-duty diesel exhaust emission control system to meet ULEV emissions standard' Paper presented at Powertrain and Fluid Systems Conference and Exhibition, San Antonio, TX, United States, 10/24/05 - 10/27/05, . https://doi.org/10.4271/2005-01-3877

Penn state futuretruck hybrid electric vehicle : Light-duty diesel exhaust emission control system to meet ULEV emissions standard. / Chapman, Elana; Pflumm, Scott; Kung, Eugene; Acharya, Ragini; Saxon, Jeffrey; Feldman, Brian; Herrold, Brian; Wilson, Keith; Safabakhsh, Peyman; Shirk, Matt; Caserta, Jonathan; Boehman, André; Haworth, Daniel Connell; Koga, Hibiki; Tadros, Ted; Maglast, Don; Blackman, Larry.

2005. Paper presented at Powertrain and Fluid Systems Conference and Exhibition, San Antonio, TX, United States.

Research output: Contribution to conferencePaper

TY - CONF

T1 - Penn state futuretruck hybrid electric vehicle

T2 - Light-duty diesel exhaust emission control system to meet ULEV emissions standard

AU - Chapman, Elana

AU - Pflumm, Scott

AU - Kung, Eugene

AU - Acharya, Ragini

AU - Saxon, Jeffrey

AU - Feldman, Brian

AU - Herrold, Brian

AU - Wilson, Keith

AU - Safabakhsh, Peyman

AU - Shirk, Matt

AU - Caserta, Jonathan

AU - Boehman, André

AU - Haworth, Daniel Connell

AU - Koga, Hibiki

AU - Tadros, Ted

AU - Maglast, Don

AU - Blackman, Larry

PY - 2005/12/1

Y1 - 2005/12/1

N2 - Two of the goals of the Penn State FutureTruck project were to reduce the emissions of the hybrid electric Ford Explorer to ULEV or lower, and improve the fuel economy by 25% over the stock vehicle. The hybrid electric vehicle system is powered with a 103kW 2.5L Detroit Diesel engine which operates with a fuel blend consisting of ultra-low-sulfur diesel and biodiesel (35%). Lower emissions are inherently achieved by the use of biodiesel. Additionally, the engine was fitted with a series of aftertreatment devices in an effort to achieve the low emissions standards. Vehicle testing has shown a gasoline-equivalent fuel economy improvement of approximately 22%, a reduction in greenhouse gas emissions by approximately 38%, and meeting or exceeding stock emissions numbers in all other categories through the use of an advanced catalyst and control strategy. This paper will review the engine and emissions system strategy to meet the low emissions standards, detail the operation of the aftertreatment system, detail the process by which it was tested in an engine dyno lab and chassis dyno lab, and review the control optimization. Most importantly, the data will suggest what further optimization would need to be completed to meet lower emissions standards. Finally, this paper suggests some further research and questions to be answered in preparing and optimizing an aftertreatment system for a light-duty diesel engine. Figure 1The Penn State University Hybrid-Electric Ford Explorer, the "Wattmuncher". [1]

AB - Two of the goals of the Penn State FutureTruck project were to reduce the emissions of the hybrid electric Ford Explorer to ULEV or lower, and improve the fuel economy by 25% over the stock vehicle. The hybrid electric vehicle system is powered with a 103kW 2.5L Detroit Diesel engine which operates with a fuel blend consisting of ultra-low-sulfur diesel and biodiesel (35%). Lower emissions are inherently achieved by the use of biodiesel. Additionally, the engine was fitted with a series of aftertreatment devices in an effort to achieve the low emissions standards. Vehicle testing has shown a gasoline-equivalent fuel economy improvement of approximately 22%, a reduction in greenhouse gas emissions by approximately 38%, and meeting or exceeding stock emissions numbers in all other categories through the use of an advanced catalyst and control strategy. This paper will review the engine and emissions system strategy to meet the low emissions standards, detail the operation of the aftertreatment system, detail the process by which it was tested in an engine dyno lab and chassis dyno lab, and review the control optimization. Most importantly, the data will suggest what further optimization would need to be completed to meet lower emissions standards. Finally, this paper suggests some further research and questions to be answered in preparing and optimizing an aftertreatment system for a light-duty diesel engine. Figure 1The Penn State University Hybrid-Electric Ford Explorer, the "Wattmuncher". [1]

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M3 - Paper

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Chapman E, Pflumm S, Kung E, Acharya R, Saxon J, Feldman B et al. Penn state futuretruck hybrid electric vehicle: Light-duty diesel exhaust emission control system to meet ULEV emissions standard. 2005. Paper presented at Powertrain and Fluid Systems Conference and Exhibition, San Antonio, TX, United States. https://doi.org/10.4271/2005-01-3877