Perceived risk of cervical cancer in appalachian women

Kimberly M. Kelly, Amy K. Ferketich, Mack Ruffin, Cathy Tatum, Electra D. Paskett

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: To examine perceptions of cervical cancer risk in elevated-risk Appalachians. Methods: Appalachian women (n=571) completed interviews examining self-regulation model factors relevant to perceived risk of cervical cancer. Results: Women with good/very good knowledge of cervical cancer, greater worry, and history of sexually transmitted infection had higher odds of rating their perceived risk as somewhat/ much higher than did other women. Former smokers, compared to never smokers, had lower risk perceptions. Conclusions: Self-regulation model factors are important to understanding perceptions of cervical cancer risk in underserved women. The relationship of smoking and worry to perceived risk may be a target for intervention. Copyright (c) PNG Publications.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)849-859
Number of pages11
JournalAmerican Journal of Health Behavior
Volume36
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 1 2012

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Uterine Cervical Neoplasms
cancer
self-regulation
Sexually Transmitted Diseases
Publications
smoking
Smoking
rating
Interviews
interview

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Health(social science)
  • Social Psychology
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

Kelly, Kimberly M. ; Ferketich, Amy K. ; Ruffin, Mack ; Tatum, Cathy ; Paskett, Electra D. / Perceived risk of cervical cancer in appalachian women. In: American Journal of Health Behavior. 2012 ; Vol. 36, No. 6. pp. 849-859.
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Perceived risk of cervical cancer in appalachian women. / Kelly, Kimberly M.; Ferketich, Amy K.; Ruffin, Mack; Tatum, Cathy; Paskett, Electra D.

In: American Journal of Health Behavior, Vol. 36, No. 6, 01.11.2012, p. 849-859.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

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