Perceptions of control in children with externalizing and mixed behavior disorders

Yolanda Jackson, Paul Frick, Jennifer Dravage-Bush

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

12 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Examined the differences in the perception of control in 67 school-age children with externalizing and children with both externalizing and internalizing behavior problems. The results indicated that children with externalizing behavior and mixed behavior could be differentiated by their perception of control. Specifically, children with externalizing behavior endorsed a significantly stronger unknown locus of control than children in the mixed behavior group. Findings suggest that when behavior groups are clearly defined, neither external nor internal locus of control is the dominant style. Implications for the findings are discussed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)43-58
Number of pages16
JournalChild Psychiatry and Human Development
Volume31
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 17 2000

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Mental Disorders
Internal-External Control

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Cite this

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Perceptions of control in children with externalizing and mixed behavior disorders. / Jackson, Yolanda; Frick, Paul; Dravage-Bush, Jennifer.

In: Child Psychiatry and Human Development, Vol. 31, No. 1, 17.10.2000, p. 43-58.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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