Perceptions of Partner Violence: How Aggressor Gender, Masculinity/Femininity, and Victim Gender Influence Criminal Justice Decisions

Brenda L. Russell, Shane Kraus

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

ABSTRACT: This study examines the extent to which perceptions of partner violence are influenced by aggressor gender and masculinity/femininity, and victim gender. Participants evaluated a case scenario depicting domestic assault. Results found charges were significantly higher and sentences significantly longer when the victim was female. Masculine aggressors were more likely to be perceived as having threatened bodily injury and as having initiated the assault compared to feminine aggressors. Masculine aggressors in heterosexual relationships were more likely to be identified as having initiated an assault compared to feminine aggressors in heterosexual relationships or individuals in same-sex relationships.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)679-691
Number of pages13
JournalDeviant Behavior
Volume37
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 2 2016

Fingerprint

Femininity
Masculinity
Criminal Law
Heterosexuality
femininity
assault
Violence
masculinity
justice
violence
gender
Wounds and Injuries
scenario

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Social Psychology
  • Clinical Psychology
  • Sociology and Political Science
  • Law

Cite this

@article{809cb5878f2248d7a766b9fe3b4da872,
title = "Perceptions of Partner Violence: How Aggressor Gender, Masculinity/Femininity, and Victim Gender Influence Criminal Justice Decisions",
abstract = "ABSTRACT: This study examines the extent to which perceptions of partner violence are influenced by aggressor gender and masculinity/femininity, and victim gender. Participants evaluated a case scenario depicting domestic assault. Results found charges were significantly higher and sentences significantly longer when the victim was female. Masculine aggressors were more likely to be perceived as having threatened bodily injury and as having initiated the assault compared to feminine aggressors. Masculine aggressors in heterosexual relationships were more likely to be identified as having initiated an assault compared to feminine aggressors in heterosexual relationships or individuals in same-sex relationships.",
author = "Russell, {Brenda L.} and Shane Kraus",
year = "2016",
month = "6",
day = "2",
doi = "10.1080/01639625.2015.1060815",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "37",
pages = "679--691",
journal = "Deviant Behavior",
issn = "0163-9625",
publisher = "Taylor and Francis Ltd.",
number = "6",

}

Perceptions of Partner Violence : How Aggressor Gender, Masculinity/Femininity, and Victim Gender Influence Criminal Justice Decisions. / Russell, Brenda L.; Kraus, Shane.

In: Deviant Behavior, Vol. 37, No. 6, 02.06.2016, p. 679-691.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Perceptions of Partner Violence

T2 - How Aggressor Gender, Masculinity/Femininity, and Victim Gender Influence Criminal Justice Decisions

AU - Russell, Brenda L.

AU - Kraus, Shane

PY - 2016/6/2

Y1 - 2016/6/2

N2 - ABSTRACT: This study examines the extent to which perceptions of partner violence are influenced by aggressor gender and masculinity/femininity, and victim gender. Participants evaluated a case scenario depicting domestic assault. Results found charges were significantly higher and sentences significantly longer when the victim was female. Masculine aggressors were more likely to be perceived as having threatened bodily injury and as having initiated the assault compared to feminine aggressors. Masculine aggressors in heterosexual relationships were more likely to be identified as having initiated an assault compared to feminine aggressors in heterosexual relationships or individuals in same-sex relationships.

AB - ABSTRACT: This study examines the extent to which perceptions of partner violence are influenced by aggressor gender and masculinity/femininity, and victim gender. Participants evaluated a case scenario depicting domestic assault. Results found charges were significantly higher and sentences significantly longer when the victim was female. Masculine aggressors were more likely to be perceived as having threatened bodily injury and as having initiated the assault compared to feminine aggressors. Masculine aggressors in heterosexual relationships were more likely to be identified as having initiated an assault compared to feminine aggressors in heterosexual relationships or individuals in same-sex relationships.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84961202354&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84961202354&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1080/01639625.2015.1060815

DO - 10.1080/01639625.2015.1060815

M3 - Article

AN - SCOPUS:84961202354

VL - 37

SP - 679

EP - 691

JO - Deviant Behavior

JF - Deviant Behavior

SN - 0163-9625

IS - 6

ER -