Perchlorate removal via iron-preloaded GAC and borohydride regeneration

Chongzheng Na, Fred Scott Cannon, Ben Hagerup

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

37 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Tailored granular activated carbon (GAC) can reduce groundwater perchlorate levels from 60-80 μg/L to below detection. Specifically, rapid small-scale column tests, also called RSSCTs, showed that by preloading GAC with iron-oxalic acid, the GAC adsorption capacity could be improved up to 42%. When the preloaded GAC became saturated with perchlorate, 65-74% of the GAC's original adsorption capacity could be restored by chemically regenerating the GAC with sodium borohydride. This chemical regeneration could be achieved with the use of a small fraction of the water that had been processed during the water treatment cycle. The waste stream from chemical regeneration contained concentrated perchlorate levels as high as 7,000-15,000 μg/L. With this approach, the simulations described in this article indicated that when two tailored GAC beds were operated in series with a 40-min empty-bed contact time, they could provide water treatment service for 60-75 days during the first operations cycle; following chemical regeneration, the GAC beds could provide about an additional 30-40 days of water service for several successive treatment and regeneration cycles.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)90-102
Number of pages13
JournalJournal / American Water Works Association
Volume94
Issue number11
StatePublished - Nov 1 2002

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Borohydrides
perchlorate
Activated carbon
activated carbon
Iron
regeneration
iron
Water treatment
water treatment
adsorption
Adsorption
Oxalic Acid
preloading
Water
oxalic acid
removal
Groundwater
sodium
water
groundwater

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Chemistry(all)
  • Water Science and Technology

Cite this

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Perchlorate removal via iron-preloaded GAC and borohydride regeneration. / Na, Chongzheng; Cannon, Fred Scott; Hagerup, Ben.

In: Journal / American Water Works Association, Vol. 94, No. 11, 01.11.2002, p. 90-102.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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