Performance of public film cooling geometries produced through additive manufacturing

Jacob C. Snyder, Karen A. Thole

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

Film cooling is an essential cooling technology to allow modern gas turbines to operate at high temperatures. For years, researchers in this community have worked to improve the effectiveness of film cooling configurations by maximizing the coolant coverage and minimizing the heat flux from the hot gas into the part. Working towards this goal has generated many promising film cooling concepts with unique shapes and configurations. However, until recently, many of these designs were challenging to manufacture in actual turbine hardware due to limitations with legacy manufacturing methods. Now, with the advances in additive manufacturing, it is possible to create turbine parts using high temperature nickel alloys that feature detailed and unique geometry features. Armed with this new manufacturing power, this study aims to build and test the promising designs from the public literature that were previously difficult or impossible to implement. In this study, different cooling hole designs were manufactured in test coupons using a laser powder bed fusion process. Each nickel alloy coupon featured a single row of engine scale cooling holes, fed by a micro-channel. To evaluate performance, the overall cooling effectiveness of each coupon was measured using a matched Biot test at engine relevant conditions. The results showed that certain hole shapes are better suited for additive manufacturing than others, and that the manufacturing process can cause significant deviations from the performance reported in literature.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationHeat Transfer
PublisherAmerican Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME)
ISBN (Electronic)9780791858653
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2019
EventASME Turbo Expo 2019: Turbomachinery Technical Conference and Exposition, GT 2019 - Phoenix, United States
Duration: Jun 17 2019Jun 21 2019

Publication series

NameProceedings of the ASME Turbo Expo
Volume5B-2019

Conference

ConferenceASME Turbo Expo 2019: Turbomachinery Technical Conference and Exposition, GT 2019
CountryUnited States
CityPhoenix
Period6/17/196/21/19

Fingerprint

3D printers
Cooling
Geometry
Nickel alloys
Turbines
Engines
Superalloys
Coolants
Gas turbines
Heat flux
Fusion reactions
Hardware
Powders
Lasers

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Engineering(all)

Cite this

Snyder, J. C., & Thole, K. A. (2019). Performance of public film cooling geometries produced through additive manufacturing. In Heat Transfer (Proceedings of the ASME Turbo Expo; Vol. 5B-2019). American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME). https://doi.org/10.1115/GT2019-90877
Snyder, Jacob C. ; Thole, Karen A. / Performance of public film cooling geometries produced through additive manufacturing. Heat Transfer. American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME), 2019. (Proceedings of the ASME Turbo Expo).
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Snyder, JC & Thole, KA 2019, Performance of public film cooling geometries produced through additive manufacturing. in Heat Transfer. Proceedings of the ASME Turbo Expo, vol. 5B-2019, American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME), ASME Turbo Expo 2019: Turbomachinery Technical Conference and Exposition, GT 2019, Phoenix, United States, 6/17/19. https://doi.org/10.1115/GT2019-90877

Performance of public film cooling geometries produced through additive manufacturing. / Snyder, Jacob C.; Thole, Karen A.

Heat Transfer. American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME), 2019. (Proceedings of the ASME Turbo Expo; Vol. 5B-2019).

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

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Snyder JC, Thole KA. Performance of public film cooling geometries produced through additive manufacturing. In Heat Transfer. American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME). 2019. (Proceedings of the ASME Turbo Expo). https://doi.org/10.1115/GT2019-90877