Peritonsillar abscess in children: A 10-year review of diagnosis and management

Scott Schraff, Johnathan McGinn, Craig S. Derkay

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

66 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: peritonsillar abscess is the most common deep neck infection in adults and children. However, pediatric patients with their smaller anatomy and often inability to cooperate with exam and treatment, provide a challenge. This study reviews the experience over the last 10 years at a children's hospital in the diagnosis and treatment of pediatric peritonsillar abscess. Methods: a retrospective chart review of 83 children diagnosed with a peritonsillar abscess by the Otolaryngology service over a 10-year period (March 1989-February 1999) were reviewed. Presenting signs and symptoms, physical findings, age, season of presentation, prior pharyngitis history, and prior treatment was collected from the charts. Additionally, diagnostic studies (if any), treatment performed, bacteriology, and outcome/complications were noted. Results: due to either an inability to cooperate fully for examination and treatment, or because of an earlier history of significant recurrent pharyngitis or obstructive tonsillar hypertrophy, half of the children required treatment in the operating room. Twenty-six out of 83 (31%) underwent a quinsy tonsillectomy. Length of stay was relatively short (0.9 days). There were no recurrent PTAs in our series, although four children initially treated with incision and drainage required tonsillectomy for persistent symptoms or residual abscess. Ten of those not treated with tonsillectomy (19%) required interval tonsillectomy for recurrent pharyngitis. Conclusion: limited by the ability to cooperate with treatment, children often require different treatment plans. We offer a treatment algorithm for managing children with PTAs that takes into account their age, level of cooperativeness, co-morbidities and prior history of pharyngitis, PTA or obstructive sleep disorder.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)213-218
Number of pages6
JournalInternational Journal of Pediatric Otorhinolaryngology
Volume57
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1 2001

Fingerprint

Peritonsillar Abscess
antineoplaston A10
Tonsillectomy
Pharyngitis
Therapeutics
Pediatrics
Bacteriology
Aptitude
Otolaryngology
Operating Rooms
Abscess
Hypertrophy
Signs and Symptoms
Drainage
Length of Stay
Anatomy
Neck

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Otorhinolaryngology

Cite this

@article{df41c8a94c96494098de5ab4ce6d25f3,
title = "Peritonsillar abscess in children: A 10-year review of diagnosis and management",
abstract = "Objective: peritonsillar abscess is the most common deep neck infection in adults and children. However, pediatric patients with their smaller anatomy and often inability to cooperate with exam and treatment, provide a challenge. This study reviews the experience over the last 10 years at a children's hospital in the diagnosis and treatment of pediatric peritonsillar abscess. Methods: a retrospective chart review of 83 children diagnosed with a peritonsillar abscess by the Otolaryngology service over a 10-year period (March 1989-February 1999) were reviewed. Presenting signs and symptoms, physical findings, age, season of presentation, prior pharyngitis history, and prior treatment was collected from the charts. Additionally, diagnostic studies (if any), treatment performed, bacteriology, and outcome/complications were noted. Results: due to either an inability to cooperate fully for examination and treatment, or because of an earlier history of significant recurrent pharyngitis or obstructive tonsillar hypertrophy, half of the children required treatment in the operating room. Twenty-six out of 83 (31{\%}) underwent a quinsy tonsillectomy. Length of stay was relatively short (0.9 days). There were no recurrent PTAs in our series, although four children initially treated with incision and drainage required tonsillectomy for persistent symptoms or residual abscess. Ten of those not treated with tonsillectomy (19{\%}) required interval tonsillectomy for recurrent pharyngitis. Conclusion: limited by the ability to cooperate with treatment, children often require different treatment plans. We offer a treatment algorithm for managing children with PTAs that takes into account their age, level of cooperativeness, co-morbidities and prior history of pharyngitis, PTA or obstructive sleep disorder.",
author = "Scott Schraff and Johnathan McGinn and Derkay, {Craig S.}",
year = "2001",
month = "3",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1016/S0165-5876(00)00447-X",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "57",
pages = "213--218",
journal = "International Journal of Pediatric Otorhinolaryngology",
issn = "0165-5876",
publisher = "Elsevier Ireland Ltd",
number = "3",

}

Peritonsillar abscess in children : A 10-year review of diagnosis and management. / Schraff, Scott; McGinn, Johnathan; Derkay, Craig S.

In: International Journal of Pediatric Otorhinolaryngology, Vol. 57, No. 3, 01.03.2001, p. 213-218.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Peritonsillar abscess in children

T2 - A 10-year review of diagnosis and management

AU - Schraff, Scott

AU - McGinn, Johnathan

AU - Derkay, Craig S.

PY - 2001/3/1

Y1 - 2001/3/1

N2 - Objective: peritonsillar abscess is the most common deep neck infection in adults and children. However, pediatric patients with their smaller anatomy and often inability to cooperate with exam and treatment, provide a challenge. This study reviews the experience over the last 10 years at a children's hospital in the diagnosis and treatment of pediatric peritonsillar abscess. Methods: a retrospective chart review of 83 children diagnosed with a peritonsillar abscess by the Otolaryngology service over a 10-year period (March 1989-February 1999) were reviewed. Presenting signs and symptoms, physical findings, age, season of presentation, prior pharyngitis history, and prior treatment was collected from the charts. Additionally, diagnostic studies (if any), treatment performed, bacteriology, and outcome/complications were noted. Results: due to either an inability to cooperate fully for examination and treatment, or because of an earlier history of significant recurrent pharyngitis or obstructive tonsillar hypertrophy, half of the children required treatment in the operating room. Twenty-six out of 83 (31%) underwent a quinsy tonsillectomy. Length of stay was relatively short (0.9 days). There were no recurrent PTAs in our series, although four children initially treated with incision and drainage required tonsillectomy for persistent symptoms or residual abscess. Ten of those not treated with tonsillectomy (19%) required interval tonsillectomy for recurrent pharyngitis. Conclusion: limited by the ability to cooperate with treatment, children often require different treatment plans. We offer a treatment algorithm for managing children with PTAs that takes into account their age, level of cooperativeness, co-morbidities and prior history of pharyngitis, PTA or obstructive sleep disorder.

AB - Objective: peritonsillar abscess is the most common deep neck infection in adults and children. However, pediatric patients with their smaller anatomy and often inability to cooperate with exam and treatment, provide a challenge. This study reviews the experience over the last 10 years at a children's hospital in the diagnosis and treatment of pediatric peritonsillar abscess. Methods: a retrospective chart review of 83 children diagnosed with a peritonsillar abscess by the Otolaryngology service over a 10-year period (March 1989-February 1999) were reviewed. Presenting signs and symptoms, physical findings, age, season of presentation, prior pharyngitis history, and prior treatment was collected from the charts. Additionally, diagnostic studies (if any), treatment performed, bacteriology, and outcome/complications were noted. Results: due to either an inability to cooperate fully for examination and treatment, or because of an earlier history of significant recurrent pharyngitis or obstructive tonsillar hypertrophy, half of the children required treatment in the operating room. Twenty-six out of 83 (31%) underwent a quinsy tonsillectomy. Length of stay was relatively short (0.9 days). There were no recurrent PTAs in our series, although four children initially treated with incision and drainage required tonsillectomy for persistent symptoms or residual abscess. Ten of those not treated with tonsillectomy (19%) required interval tonsillectomy for recurrent pharyngitis. Conclusion: limited by the ability to cooperate with treatment, children often require different treatment plans. We offer a treatment algorithm for managing children with PTAs that takes into account their age, level of cooperativeness, co-morbidities and prior history of pharyngitis, PTA or obstructive sleep disorder.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0035283621&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0035283621&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/S0165-5876(00)00447-X

DO - 10.1016/S0165-5876(00)00447-X

M3 - Article

C2 - 11223453

AN - SCOPUS:0035283621

VL - 57

SP - 213

EP - 218

JO - International Journal of Pediatric Otorhinolaryngology

JF - International Journal of Pediatric Otorhinolaryngology

SN - 0165-5876

IS - 3

ER -