Permanent left ventricular assist device

In vivo testing

Gerson Rosenberg, Alan J. Snyder, William Weiss, Thomas J. Cleary, William S. Pierce

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

An electric-motor-driven left-ventricular-assist device has been under in vivo evaluation since 1984. The device has been implanted in twelve calves, the longest surviving 174 days and the average survival being 64 days. The device contains a brushless DC motor and a rollerscrew mechanism. The mechanism produces rectilinear motion of a pusher plate, which pushes on the segmented polyurethane blood sac. In three of the twelve animal experiments, a transcutaneous energy transmission system was utilized to transmit energy across the intact skin. The reasons for termination of the experiments were a variety of factors, including cracked polysulfone blood pump cases, inlet obstruction, a broken cable, and rust on components that were manufactured of an improper material. Thromboembolic complications were seen in only one of twelve animals. Average survival times increased from an annual average of 25 days in 1984 to over 74 days in 1987.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationIEEE/Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society Annual Conference
PublisherPubl by IEEE
Pages65-67
Number of pages3
Volume10
Editionpt 1
StatePublished - Nov 1988
EventProceedings of the Annual International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society - New Orleans, LA, USA
Duration: Nov 4 1988Nov 7 1988

Other

OtherProceedings of the Annual International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society
CityNew Orleans, LA, USA
Period11/4/8811/7/88

Fingerprint

Left ventricular assist devices
Animals
Blood
Brushless DC motors
Polysulfones
Electric motors
Testing
Polyurethanes
Skin
Cables
Experiments
Pumps

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Engineering(all)

Cite this

Rosenberg, G., Snyder, A. J., Weiss, W., Cleary, T. J., & Pierce, W. S. (1988). Permanent left ventricular assist device: In vivo testing. In IEEE/Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society Annual Conference (pt 1 ed., Vol. 10, pp. 65-67). Publ by IEEE.
Rosenberg, Gerson ; Snyder, Alan J. ; Weiss, William ; Cleary, Thomas J. ; Pierce, William S. / Permanent left ventricular assist device : In vivo testing. IEEE/Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society Annual Conference. Vol. 10 pt 1. ed. Publ by IEEE, 1988. pp. 65-67
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Rosenberg, G, Snyder, AJ, Weiss, W, Cleary, TJ & Pierce, WS 1988, Permanent left ventricular assist device: In vivo testing. in IEEE/Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society Annual Conference. pt 1 edn, vol. 10, Publ by IEEE, pp. 65-67, Proceedings of the Annual International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society, New Orleans, LA, USA, 11/4/88.

Permanent left ventricular assist device : In vivo testing. / Rosenberg, Gerson; Snyder, Alan J.; Weiss, William; Cleary, Thomas J.; Pierce, William S.

IEEE/Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society Annual Conference. Vol. 10 pt 1. ed. Publ by IEEE, 1988. p. 65-67.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

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AU - Weiss, William

AU - Cleary, Thomas J.

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Rosenberg G, Snyder AJ, Weiss W, Cleary TJ, Pierce WS. Permanent left ventricular assist device: In vivo testing. In IEEE/Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society Annual Conference. pt 1 ed. Vol. 10. Publ by IEEE. 1988. p. 65-67