Permanent war? The domestic hegemony of the New American militarism

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Although there is an expanding body of excellent work on 9/11 and the War on Terror, and the changing forms of war‐making, militarism and imperialism, this literature lacks a sufficient critical synthesis of the historical and conjunctural events of 9/11 and its aftermath with the structural and systemic forms of US militarism and the military‐industrial complex. This article attempts a broad, critical‐theoretical analysis of the increased domestic hegemony of militarism in the US since 9/11. The article examines the complex social‐systemic interlocking of militarism with other historical, political, institutional, economic, cultural and psychological forces which tend to reinforce the hegemony of militarism and aggressive, preemptive foreign policy in the current period.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)551-567
Number of pages17
JournalNew Political Science
Volume26
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2004

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militarism
hegemony
institutional economics
imperialism
foreign policy
terrorism
event
lack

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Sociology and Political Science

Cite this

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Permanent war? The domestic hegemony of the New American militarism. / Cunningham, Kenneth Brian.

In: New Political Science, Vol. 26, No. 4, 01.01.2004, p. 551-567.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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