Personal Control and Inmate Adjustment to Prison

LYNNE GOODSTEIN, Doris Layton Mackenzie, R. LANCE SHOTLAND

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

63 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Although this concept has rarely been investigated systematically, the prison is an environment that severely limits inmates’personal control. This article applies theoretical and empirical advances in the area of personal control to the issue of inmate adjustment to prison. Personal control has three components: outcome control, choice, and predictability of future events. Research findings suggesting adverse impacts of limited control are discussed in light of their implications for prisoner adjustment. Several models of personal control, including the environmental/learned helplessness, individual difference/self‐efficacy, and incongruency/reactance models, are applied to the process of prisoner adjustment. Using these models, a conceptual framework for integrating past research in the sociology and social psychology of corrections is proposed, and directions for future research are discussed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)343-369
Number of pages27
JournalCriminology
Volume22
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1984

Fingerprint

Social Adjustment
Prisons
correctional institution
Prisoners
Learned Helplessness
Social Psychology
Sociology
prisoner
Research
Individuality
reactance
social psychology
sociology
event

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Pathology and Forensic Medicine
  • Law

Cite this

GOODSTEIN, LYNNE., Mackenzie, D. L., & SHOTLAND, R. LANCE. (1984). Personal Control and Inmate Adjustment to Prison. Criminology, 22(3), 343-369. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1745-9125.1984.tb00304.x
GOODSTEIN, LYNNE ; Mackenzie, Doris Layton ; SHOTLAND, R. LANCE. / Personal Control and Inmate Adjustment to Prison. In: Criminology. 1984 ; Vol. 22, No. 3. pp. 343-369.
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GOODSTEIN, LYNNE, Mackenzie, DL & SHOTLAND, RLANCE 1984, 'Personal Control and Inmate Adjustment to Prison', Criminology, vol. 22, no. 3, pp. 343-369. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1745-9125.1984.tb00304.x

Personal Control and Inmate Adjustment to Prison. / GOODSTEIN, LYNNE; Mackenzie, Doris Layton; SHOTLAND, R. LANCE.

In: Criminology, Vol. 22, No. 3, 01.01.1984, p. 343-369.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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GOODSTEIN LYNNE, Mackenzie DL, SHOTLAND RLANCE. Personal Control and Inmate Adjustment to Prison. Criminology. 1984 Jan 1;22(3):343-369. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1745-9125.1984.tb00304.x