Personality and stressor-related affect

Kate A. Leger, Susan T. Charles, Nicholas A. Turiano, David M. Almeida

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

27 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Greater increases in negative affect and greater decreases in positive affect on days stressors occur portend poorer mental and physical health years later. Although personality traits influence stressorrelated affect, only neuroticism and extraversion among the Big Five personality traits have been examined in any detail. Moreover, personality traits may shape how people appraise daily stressors, yet few studies have examined how stressor-related appraisals may account for associations between personality and stressor-related affect. Two studies used participants (N = 2,022; age range: 30-84) from the National Study of Daily Experiences II to examine the associations between Big Five personality traits and stressor-related affect and how appraisals may account for these relationships. Results from Study 1 indicate that higher levels of extraversion, conscientiousness, and openness to experience and lower levels of neuroticism are related to less stressor-related negative affect. Only agreeableness was associated with stressor-related positive affect, such that higher levels were related to greater decreases in positive affect on days stressors occur. The second study found that stressor-related appraisals partially accounted for the significant associations between stressor-related negative affect and personality. Implications for these findings in relation to how personality may influence physical and emotional health are discussed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)917-928
Number of pages12
JournalJournal of Personality and Social Psychology
Volume111
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2016

Fingerprint

personality traits
Personality
personality
neuroticism
health
experience
Mental Health
Health

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Social Psychology
  • Sociology and Political Science

Cite this

Leger, Kate A. ; Charles, Susan T. ; Turiano, Nicholas A. ; Almeida, David M. / Personality and stressor-related affect. In: Journal of Personality and Social Psychology. 2016 ; Vol. 111, No. 6. pp. 917-928.
@article{7bb86523827c4384a17862593ed2efc9,
title = "Personality and stressor-related affect",
abstract = "Greater increases in negative affect and greater decreases in positive affect on days stressors occur portend poorer mental and physical health years later. Although personality traits influence stressorrelated affect, only neuroticism and extraversion among the Big Five personality traits have been examined in any detail. Moreover, personality traits may shape how people appraise daily stressors, yet few studies have examined how stressor-related appraisals may account for associations between personality and stressor-related affect. Two studies used participants (N = 2,022; age range: 30-84) from the National Study of Daily Experiences II to examine the associations between Big Five personality traits and stressor-related affect and how appraisals may account for these relationships. Results from Study 1 indicate that higher levels of extraversion, conscientiousness, and openness to experience and lower levels of neuroticism are related to less stressor-related negative affect. Only agreeableness was associated with stressor-related positive affect, such that higher levels were related to greater decreases in positive affect on days stressors occur. The second study found that stressor-related appraisals partially accounted for the significant associations between stressor-related negative affect and personality. Implications for these findings in relation to how personality may influence physical and emotional health are discussed.",
author = "Leger, {Kate A.} and Charles, {Susan T.} and Turiano, {Nicholas A.} and Almeida, {David M.}",
year = "2016",
month = "12",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1037/pspp0000083",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "111",
pages = "917--928",
journal = "Journal of Personality and Social Psychology",
issn = "0022-3514",
publisher = "American Psychological Association Inc.",
number = "6",

}

Personality and stressor-related affect. / Leger, Kate A.; Charles, Susan T.; Turiano, Nicholas A.; Almeida, David M.

In: Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, Vol. 111, No. 6, 01.12.2016, p. 917-928.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Personality and stressor-related affect

AU - Leger, Kate A.

AU - Charles, Susan T.

AU - Turiano, Nicholas A.

AU - Almeida, David M.

PY - 2016/12/1

Y1 - 2016/12/1

N2 - Greater increases in negative affect and greater decreases in positive affect on days stressors occur portend poorer mental and physical health years later. Although personality traits influence stressorrelated affect, only neuroticism and extraversion among the Big Five personality traits have been examined in any detail. Moreover, personality traits may shape how people appraise daily stressors, yet few studies have examined how stressor-related appraisals may account for associations between personality and stressor-related affect. Two studies used participants (N = 2,022; age range: 30-84) from the National Study of Daily Experiences II to examine the associations between Big Five personality traits and stressor-related affect and how appraisals may account for these relationships. Results from Study 1 indicate that higher levels of extraversion, conscientiousness, and openness to experience and lower levels of neuroticism are related to less stressor-related negative affect. Only agreeableness was associated with stressor-related positive affect, such that higher levels were related to greater decreases in positive affect on days stressors occur. The second study found that stressor-related appraisals partially accounted for the significant associations between stressor-related negative affect and personality. Implications for these findings in relation to how personality may influence physical and emotional health are discussed.

AB - Greater increases in negative affect and greater decreases in positive affect on days stressors occur portend poorer mental and physical health years later. Although personality traits influence stressorrelated affect, only neuroticism and extraversion among the Big Five personality traits have been examined in any detail. Moreover, personality traits may shape how people appraise daily stressors, yet few studies have examined how stressor-related appraisals may account for associations between personality and stressor-related affect. Two studies used participants (N = 2,022; age range: 30-84) from the National Study of Daily Experiences II to examine the associations between Big Five personality traits and stressor-related affect and how appraisals may account for these relationships. Results from Study 1 indicate that higher levels of extraversion, conscientiousness, and openness to experience and lower levels of neuroticism are related to less stressor-related negative affect. Only agreeableness was associated with stressor-related positive affect, such that higher levels were related to greater decreases in positive affect on days stressors occur. The second study found that stressor-related appraisals partially accounted for the significant associations between stressor-related negative affect and personality. Implications for these findings in relation to how personality may influence physical and emotional health are discussed.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84955093708&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84955093708&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1037/pspp0000083

DO - 10.1037/pspp0000083

M3 - Article

C2 - 26796984

AN - SCOPUS:84955093708

VL - 111

SP - 917

EP - 928

JO - Journal of Personality and Social Psychology

JF - Journal of Personality and Social Psychology

SN - 0022-3514

IS - 6

ER -