Personality Configurations in Self-Managed Teams: A Natural Experiment on the Effects of Maximizing and Minimizing Variance in Traits

Stephen E. Humphrey, John R. Hollenbeck, Christopher J. Meyer, Daniel R. Ilgen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

19 Scopus citations

Abstract

In this study, we examined the impact of seeding teams to create maximal and minimal levels of extroversion and conscientiousness variance. Using the theories of complementary and supplementary fit, we make predictions regarding the main and interactive effects of extroversion and conscientiousness variance on performance. Testing our hypotheses in a longitudinal study of MBA teams, our results demonstrate that the combination of minimizing conscientiousness variance (consistent with complementary fit) and maximizing extroversion variance (consistent with supplementary fit) produced the highest levels of short-term and long-term performance.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1701-1732
Number of pages32
JournalJournal of Applied Social Psychology
Volume41
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 1 2011

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Social Psychology

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Personality Configurations in Self-Managed Teams: A Natural Experiment on the Effects of Maximizing and Minimizing Variance in Traits'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this