Personality trait dimensions and the pharmacological treatment of borderline personality disorder

Erika F.H. Saunders, Kenneth R. Silk

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

27 Scopus citations

Abstract

The number of well-designed placebo-controlled studies on pharmacological treatment of borderline personality disorder has been small. We present a breakdown of results of placebo-controlled pharmacological studies, sorting target symptoms into the trait dimensions of affective instability, anxiety inhibition, cognitive-perceptual disturbances, and impulsivity-aggression. Twenty randomized placebo-controlled pharmacological trials studying typical and atypical antipsychotics, selective serotonin reuptake and monoamine oxidase inhibitors, tricyclic antidepressants, mood stabilizers, and benzodiazepines were included. A relative measure of the weight of an outcome was determined by (1) dividing the number of positive comparisons for a drug class by the total number of comparisons of all drugs of all classes for each dimension and (2) dividing the number of positive comparisons for a drug class by the total number of comparisons for that particular drug class for that trait dimension. Antipsychotics (neuroleptics and atypicals) had the most evidence for each of the traits with both methods. Our results are compared with the results of 2 meta-analyses, 1 guideline set, and 1 other systematic review. We found little concordance across these studies. We propose a consortium to discuss guidelines for future studies, including agreement as to what should be measured to determine the outcome and adoption of standardized instruments to measure that outcome.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)461-467
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Clinical Psychopharmacology
Volume29
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1 2009

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Pharmacology (medical)

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