Perspectives from the field: Oil and gas impacts on forest ecosystems: Findings gleaned from the 2012 goddard forum at Penn State University

Patrick Joseph Drohan, James Craig Finley, Paul Roth, Thomas M. Schuler, Susan L Stout, Margaret Brittingham-Brant, Nels C. Johnson

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

10 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Energy production presents numerous challenges to both industry and land managers across the globe. The recent development of unconventional (shale gas) plays around the world [US Energy Information Administration (USEIA), 2011] has brought attention to the potential for rapid change in affected landscapes and associated ecosystem services. While shale-gas development specifically has been the focus of recent research on how landscapes are changing (Drohan et al., 2012; Entrekin et al., 2011; Johnson, 2010), continued scientific investigation can lessen the resulting ecosystem disturbance across all energy infrastructure.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)394-399
Number of pages6
JournalEnvironmental Practice
Volume14
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2012

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gas field
oil field
forest ecosystem
energy
energy production
ecosystem service
infrastructure
manager
disturbance
industry
ecosystem
shale gas
land
world

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Geography, Planning and Development
  • Management, Monitoring, Policy and Law

Cite this

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abstract = "Energy production presents numerous challenges to both industry and land managers across the globe. The recent development of unconventional (shale gas) plays around the world [US Energy Information Administration (USEIA), 2011] has brought attention to the potential for rapid change in affected landscapes and associated ecosystem services. While shale-gas development specifically has been the focus of recent research on how landscapes are changing (Drohan et al., 2012; Entrekin et al., 2011; Johnson, 2010), continued scientific investigation can lessen the resulting ecosystem disturbance across all energy infrastructure.",
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Perspectives from the field : Oil and gas impacts on forest ecosystems: Findings gleaned from the 2012 goddard forum at Penn State University. / Drohan, Patrick Joseph; Finley, James Craig; Roth, Paul; Schuler, Thomas M.; Stout, Susan L; Brittingham-Brant, Margaret; Johnson, Nels C.

In: Environmental Practice, Vol. 14, No. 4, 01.12.2012, p. 394-399.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

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T2 - Oil and gas impacts on forest ecosystems: Findings gleaned from the 2012 goddard forum at Penn State University

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AU - Finley, James Craig

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AU - Stout, Susan L

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AU - Johnson, Nels C.

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