Phase and pattern calibration of the jicamarca radio observatory radar using satellites

B. Gao, J. D. Mathews

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    8 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    The Jicamarca Radio Observatory (JRO) main 50-MHz array antenna radar system with multiple receivers is being used to study meteors via two interferometric receiving modes. One of the major challenges in these studies is the phase calibration of the various receiver (interferometric) channels (legs). While investigating some ambiguous features in meteor headecho results, we developed a 'new' calibration technique that employs satellite observations to produce more accurate phase and pattern measurements than were previously available. This calibration technique, which resolves head-echo ambiguities, uses the fact that Earthorbiting satellites are in gravitationally well-defined orbits and thus the pulse-to-pulse radar returns must be consistent (coherent) for an entire satellite pass through the radar beam. In particular, the satellite yields a reliable point source for phase and thus interferometry-derived range, Doppler and trajectory calibration. Using several satellites observed during standard meteor observations, we derive satellite orbital parameters by matching the observed and modelled three-dimensional trajectory and Doppler results. This approach uncovered subtle phase distortions that led to interferometry-derived trajectory distortions that are important only to point targets such as meteor head-echoes.We present the array calibration and radar imaging of satellite passes from our meteor observations of 2010 April 15/16. Future observations of a priori known satellites would likely yield significantly more accurate calibrations, especially of distant side lobes.

    Original languageEnglish (US)
    Pages (from-to)3416-3426
    Number of pages11
    JournalMonthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society
    Volume446
    Issue number4
    DOIs
    StatePublished - Jan 1 2014

    Fingerprint

    radar
    observatories
    meteoroids
    observatory
    meteor
    radio
    calibration
    trajectory
    trajectories
    interferometry
    echoes
    receivers
    pulse radar
    radar beams
    radar antennas
    imaging radar
    satellite observation
    antenna arrays
    lobes
    ambiguity

    All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

    • Astronomy and Astrophysics
    • Space and Planetary Science

    Cite this

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    title = "Phase and pattern calibration of the jicamarca radio observatory radar using satellites",
    abstract = "The Jicamarca Radio Observatory (JRO) main 50-MHz array antenna radar system with multiple receivers is being used to study meteors via two interferometric receiving modes. One of the major challenges in these studies is the phase calibration of the various receiver (interferometric) channels (legs). While investigating some ambiguous features in meteor headecho results, we developed a 'new' calibration technique that employs satellite observations to produce more accurate phase and pattern measurements than were previously available. This calibration technique, which resolves head-echo ambiguities, uses the fact that Earthorbiting satellites are in gravitationally well-defined orbits and thus the pulse-to-pulse radar returns must be consistent (coherent) for an entire satellite pass through the radar beam. In particular, the satellite yields a reliable point source for phase and thus interferometry-derived range, Doppler and trajectory calibration. Using several satellites observed during standard meteor observations, we derive satellite orbital parameters by matching the observed and modelled three-dimensional trajectory and Doppler results. This approach uncovered subtle phase distortions that led to interferometry-derived trajectory distortions that are important only to point targets such as meteor head-echoes.We present the array calibration and radar imaging of satellite passes from our meteor observations of 2010 April 15/16. Future observations of a priori known satellites would likely yield significantly more accurate calibrations, especially of distant side lobes.",
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    Phase and pattern calibration of the jicamarca radio observatory radar using satellites. / Gao, B.; Mathews, J. D.

    In: Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society, Vol. 446, No. 4, 01.01.2014, p. 3416-3426.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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