Phase-field Prediction of Critical Nucleus Morphology in Solids

Lei Zhang, Long Qing Chen, Qiang Du

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

One of the most efficient approaches to design the properties of a material is through the control of its phase transformations and microstructure evolution. The processes involved in a phase transformation are inherently multiscale. It starts with the nucleation of nanoscale nuclei of new phase particles, followed by growth and particle impingement or coarsening. In our recent works, we have developed a computational tool based on the phase-field description to predict the morphology of critical nuclei in solids under the influence of both interfacial energy anisotropy and long-range elastic interactions. Examples include cubic to cubic and cubic to tetragonal transformations. It is demonstrated that the morphology of critical nuclei in cubically anisotropic solids can be efficiently predicted without a priori assumptions. It is shown that strong elastic energy interactions may lead to critical nuclei with a wide variety of shapes including plates, needles, and cuboids with non-convex interfaces.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationProceedings of 4th International Conference on Multiscale Materials Modeling, MMM 2008
EditorsAnter El-Azab
PublisherDepartment of Scientific Computing, Florida State University
Pages514-517
Number of pages4
ISBN (Electronic)9780615247816
StatePublished - Jan 1 2008
Event4th International Conference on Multiscale Materials Modeling, MMM 2008 - Tallahassee, United States
Duration: Oct 27 2008Oct 31 2008

Publication series

NameProceedings of 4th International Conference on Multiscale Materials Modeling, MMM 2008

Conference

Conference4th International Conference on Multiscale Materials Modeling, MMM 2008
CountryUnited States
CityTallahassee
Period10/27/0810/31/08

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Materials Science(all)

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