Phase I trial of carboplatin and gemcitabine chemotherapy and stereotactic ablative radiosurgery for the palliative treatment of persistent or recurrent gynecologic cancer

Charles A. Kunos, Tracy M. Sherertz, Mazen Mislmani, Rodney J. Ellis, Simon S. Lo, Steven E. Waggoner, Kristine M. Zanotti, Karin Herrmann, Robert L. Debernardo

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

15 Scopus citations

Abstract

Background: We conducted a phase I trial to determine the safety of systemic chemotherapy prior to abdominopelvic robotic stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR) in women with persistent or recurrent gynecologic cancers. Methods: Patients were assigned to dose-finding cohorts of day 1 carboplatin (AUC 2 or 4) and gemcitabine (600 or 800 mg/m2) followed by day 2 to day 4 Cyberknife SABR (8 Gy × three consecutive daily doses). Toxicities were graded prospectively by common terminology criteria for adverse events, version 4.0. SABR target and best overall treatment responses were recorded according to response evaluation criteria in solid tumors, version 1.1. Findings: The maximum tolerated dose of chemotherapy preceding SABR was carboplatin AUC 4 and gemcitabine 600 mg/m2. One patient experienced manageable, dose-limiting grade 4 neutropenia, grade 4 hypokalemia, and grade 3 nausea attributed to study treatment. One patient had a late grade 3 rectovaginal fistula 16 months after trial therapy. Among 28 SABR targets, 22 (79%) showed a partial response and 6 (21%) remained stable. Interpretation: Systemic chemotherapy may be given safely prior to abdominopelvic robotic SABR with further investigation warranted.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number126
JournalFrontiers in Oncology
Volume5
Issue numberJUN
DOIs
StatePublished - 2015

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Oncology
  • Cancer Research

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