Phase II trial of encapsulated ginger as a treatment for chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting

Suzanna M. Zick, Mack Ruffin, Julia Lee, Daniel P. Normolle, Rivka Siden, Sara Alrawi, Dean E. Brenner

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

Goals of work: Ginger has been used to treat numerous types of nausea and vomiting. Ginger has also been studied for its efficacy for acute chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting (CINV). However, its efficacy for delayed CINV in a diverse oncology population is unknown. Materials and methods: We performed a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial in 162 patients with cancer who were receiving chemotherapy and had experienced CINV during at least one previous round of chemotherapy. All participants were receiving a 5-HT3 receptor antagonists and/or aprepitant. Participants were randomized to receive either 1.0 g ginger, 2.0 g ginger daily, or matching placebo for 3 days. The primary outcome was change in the prevalence of delayed CINV. Secondary outcomes included acute prevalence of CINV, acute and delayed severity of CINV, and assessment of blinding. Main results: There were no differences between groups in the prevalence of delayed nausea or vomiting, prevalence of acute CINV, or severity of delayed vomiting or acute nausea and vomiting. Participants who took both ginger and aprepitant had more severe acute nausea than participants who took only aprepitant. Participants were able to accurately guess which treatment they had received. Ginger appeared well tolerated, with no difference in all adverse events (AEs) and significantly less fatigue and miscellaneous AEs in the ginger group. Conclusions: Ginger provides no additional benefit for reduction of the prevalence or severity of acute or delayed CINV when given with 5-HT3 receptor antagonists and/or aprepitant.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)563-572
Number of pages10
JournalSupportive Care in Cancer
Volume17
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - May 1 2009

Fingerprint

Ginger
Nausea
Vomiting
aprepitant
Drug Therapy
Therapeutics
Serotonin 5-HT3 Receptor Antagonists
Receptors, Serotonin, 5-HT3
Placebos
Fatigue

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Oncology

Cite this

Zick, Suzanna M. ; Ruffin, Mack ; Lee, Julia ; Normolle, Daniel P. ; Siden, Rivka ; Alrawi, Sara ; Brenner, Dean E. / Phase II trial of encapsulated ginger as a treatment for chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting. In: Supportive Care in Cancer. 2009 ; Vol. 17, No. 5. pp. 563-572.
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Phase II trial of encapsulated ginger as a treatment for chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting. / Zick, Suzanna M.; Ruffin, Mack; Lee, Julia; Normolle, Daniel P.; Siden, Rivka; Alrawi, Sara; Brenner, Dean E.

In: Supportive Care in Cancer, Vol. 17, No. 5, 01.05.2009, p. 563-572.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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T1 - Phase II trial of encapsulated ginger as a treatment for chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting

AU - Zick, Suzanna M.

AU - Ruffin, Mack

AU - Lee, Julia

AU - Normolle, Daniel P.

AU - Siden, Rivka

AU - Alrawi, Sara

AU - Brenner, Dean E.

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N2 - Goals of work: Ginger has been used to treat numerous types of nausea and vomiting. Ginger has also been studied for its efficacy for acute chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting (CINV). However, its efficacy for delayed CINV in a diverse oncology population is unknown. Materials and methods: We performed a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial in 162 patients with cancer who were receiving chemotherapy and had experienced CINV during at least one previous round of chemotherapy. All participants were receiving a 5-HT3 receptor antagonists and/or aprepitant. Participants were randomized to receive either 1.0 g ginger, 2.0 g ginger daily, or matching placebo for 3 days. The primary outcome was change in the prevalence of delayed CINV. Secondary outcomes included acute prevalence of CINV, acute and delayed severity of CINV, and assessment of blinding. Main results: There were no differences between groups in the prevalence of delayed nausea or vomiting, prevalence of acute CINV, or severity of delayed vomiting or acute nausea and vomiting. Participants who took both ginger and aprepitant had more severe acute nausea than participants who took only aprepitant. Participants were able to accurately guess which treatment they had received. Ginger appeared well tolerated, with no difference in all adverse events (AEs) and significantly less fatigue and miscellaneous AEs in the ginger group. Conclusions: Ginger provides no additional benefit for reduction of the prevalence or severity of acute or delayed CINV when given with 5-HT3 receptor antagonists and/or aprepitant.

AB - Goals of work: Ginger has been used to treat numerous types of nausea and vomiting. Ginger has also been studied for its efficacy for acute chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting (CINV). However, its efficacy for delayed CINV in a diverse oncology population is unknown. Materials and methods: We performed a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial in 162 patients with cancer who were receiving chemotherapy and had experienced CINV during at least one previous round of chemotherapy. All participants were receiving a 5-HT3 receptor antagonists and/or aprepitant. Participants were randomized to receive either 1.0 g ginger, 2.0 g ginger daily, or matching placebo for 3 days. The primary outcome was change in the prevalence of delayed CINV. Secondary outcomes included acute prevalence of CINV, acute and delayed severity of CINV, and assessment of blinding. Main results: There were no differences between groups in the prevalence of delayed nausea or vomiting, prevalence of acute CINV, or severity of delayed vomiting or acute nausea and vomiting. Participants who took both ginger and aprepitant had more severe acute nausea than participants who took only aprepitant. Participants were able to accurately guess which treatment they had received. Ginger appeared well tolerated, with no difference in all adverse events (AEs) and significantly less fatigue and miscellaneous AEs in the ginger group. Conclusions: Ginger provides no additional benefit for reduction of the prevalence or severity of acute or delayed CINV when given with 5-HT3 receptor antagonists and/or aprepitant.

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