Photosynthetic response to elevated temperature in the symbiotic dinoflagellate Symbiodinium microadriaticum in culture

Roberto Iglesias-Prieto, Jaime L. Matta, Wendy A. Robins, Robert K. Trench

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

270 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Elevated temperature (28-34°C) has been hypothesized as the primary cause of the loss of algal endosymbionts in coral reef-associated invertebrates, a phenomenon observed on a world-wide scale over the last decade. In past studies of this "bleaching" phenomenon, there has been an underlying assumption that temperature adversely affects the animal hosts, the algae thereby being relegated to a more passive role. Because photosynthesis is a sensitive indicator of thermal stress in plants and has a central role in the nutrition of symbiotic invertebrates, we have tested the hypothesis that elevated temperature adversely affects photosynthesis in the symbiotic dinoflagellate Symbiodinium microadriaticum. The results, based on analyses of light-mediated O2 evolution and in vivo fluorescence, indicate that photosynthesis is impaired at temperatures above 30°C and ceases completely at 34-36°C. These observations are discussed in the context of possible mechanisms that may function in the disassociation of algalinvertebrate symbioses in response to elevated temperature.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)10302-10305
Number of pages4
JournalProceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
Volume89
Issue number21
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1992

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Dinoflagellida
Photosynthesis
Temperature
Invertebrates
Coral Reefs
Symbiosis
Hot Temperature
Fluorescence
Light

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • General

Cite this

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title = "Photosynthetic response to elevated temperature in the symbiotic dinoflagellate Symbiodinium microadriaticum in culture",
abstract = "Elevated temperature (28-34°C) has been hypothesized as the primary cause of the loss of algal endosymbionts in coral reef-associated invertebrates, a phenomenon observed on a world-wide scale over the last decade. In past studies of this {"}bleaching{"} phenomenon, there has been an underlying assumption that temperature adversely affects the animal hosts, the algae thereby being relegated to a more passive role. Because photosynthesis is a sensitive indicator of thermal stress in plants and has a central role in the nutrition of symbiotic invertebrates, we have tested the hypothesis that elevated temperature adversely affects photosynthesis in the symbiotic dinoflagellate Symbiodinium microadriaticum. The results, based on analyses of light-mediated O2 evolution and in vivo fluorescence, indicate that photosynthesis is impaired at temperatures above 30°C and ceases completely at 34-36°C. These observations are discussed in the context of possible mechanisms that may function in the disassociation of algalinvertebrate symbioses in response to elevated temperature.",
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Photosynthetic response to elevated temperature in the symbiotic dinoflagellate Symbiodinium microadriaticum in culture. / Iglesias-Prieto, Roberto; Matta, Jaime L.; Robins, Wendy A.; Trench, Robert K.

In: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, Vol. 89, No. 21, 01.01.1992, p. 10302-10305.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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AU - Iglesias-Prieto, Roberto

AU - Matta, Jaime L.

AU - Robins, Wendy A.

AU - Trench, Robert K.

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