Physical Activity and Sedentary Behavior in Older Gastrointestinal Cancer Survivors: Need and Acceptability of Digital Health Interventions

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Purpose: This study aimed to characterize physical activity (PA) and sedentary behavior (SB) profiles in older gastrointestinal (GI) cancer survivors, assess their interest in interventions to modify these behaviors, and evaluate the acceptability of digital tools for delivering interventions to modify these behaviors. Methods: Survivors (M = 65 years) from an outpatient survivorship clinic at the Penn State Cancer Institute completed a questionnaire during a clinic appointment. Results: Most survivors failed to attain the recommended level of PA (79%) or exceeded an average of 8 h of daily SB (42%). Access to internet and text messaging capabilities were high (70%), yet few survivors had access to smartphones or tablets (< 40%) or reported interest in using digital tools to improve PA or reduce SB (< 30%). Digital PA and SB interventions were more acceptable to younger survivors, survivors reporting more SB, and survivors engaging in more PA. The monetary value ascribed to digital health interventions did not differ as a function of mode of delivery (i.e., text messages, web, e-mail, tablet computer apps, or smartphone apps). Conclusions: Older GI cancer survivors can benefit from interventions to increase PA and decrease SB. Interest in such interventions was moderate and the acceptability of digital health tools for these interventions was limited. At the present time, behavioral interventions for older GI cancer survivors should not be delivered exclusively through digital tools and strategies to improve adoption of various technologies should be implemented when using these tools to modify PA and SB.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1-6
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Gastrointestinal Cancer
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - Jun 18 2018

Fingerprint

Gastrointestinal Neoplasms
Survivors
Exercise
Health
Text Messaging
Handheld Computers
Postal Service
Ambulatory Care Facilities
Internet
Tablets
Appointments and Schedules
Survival Rate
Technology

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Oncology
  • Gastroenterology

Cite this

@article{05589435c02b4a1398ab0753da99016d,
title = "Physical Activity and Sedentary Behavior in Older Gastrointestinal Cancer Survivors: Need and Acceptability of Digital Health Interventions",
abstract = "Purpose: This study aimed to characterize physical activity (PA) and sedentary behavior (SB) profiles in older gastrointestinal (GI) cancer survivors, assess their interest in interventions to modify these behaviors, and evaluate the acceptability of digital tools for delivering interventions to modify these behaviors. Methods: Survivors (M = 65 years) from an outpatient survivorship clinic at the Penn State Cancer Institute completed a questionnaire during a clinic appointment. Results: Most survivors failed to attain the recommended level of PA (79{\%}) or exceeded an average of 8 h of daily SB (42{\%}). Access to internet and text messaging capabilities were high (70{\%}), yet few survivors had access to smartphones or tablets (< 40{\%}) or reported interest in using digital tools to improve PA or reduce SB (< 30{\%}). Digital PA and SB interventions were more acceptable to younger survivors, survivors reporting more SB, and survivors engaging in more PA. The monetary value ascribed to digital health interventions did not differ as a function of mode of delivery (i.e., text messages, web, e-mail, tablet computer apps, or smartphone apps). Conclusions: Older GI cancer survivors can benefit from interventions to increase PA and decrease SB. Interest in such interventions was moderate and the acceptability of digital health tools for these interventions was limited. At the present time, behavioral interventions for older GI cancer survivors should not be delivered exclusively through digital tools and strategies to improve adoption of various technologies should be implemented when using these tools to modify PA and SB.",
author = "Sanders, {Ashley B.} and Conroy, {David E.} and Kathryn Schmitz and Gusani, {Niraj J.}",
year = "2018",
month = "6",
day = "18",
doi = "10.1007/s12029-018-0128-x",
language = "English (US)",
pages = "1--6",
journal = "Journal of Gastrointestinal Cancer",
issn = "1941-6628",
publisher = "Humana Press",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Physical Activity and Sedentary Behavior in Older Gastrointestinal Cancer Survivors

T2 - Need and Acceptability of Digital Health Interventions

AU - Sanders, Ashley B.

AU - Conroy, David E.

AU - Schmitz, Kathryn

AU - Gusani, Niraj J.

PY - 2018/6/18

Y1 - 2018/6/18

N2 - Purpose: This study aimed to characterize physical activity (PA) and sedentary behavior (SB) profiles in older gastrointestinal (GI) cancer survivors, assess their interest in interventions to modify these behaviors, and evaluate the acceptability of digital tools for delivering interventions to modify these behaviors. Methods: Survivors (M = 65 years) from an outpatient survivorship clinic at the Penn State Cancer Institute completed a questionnaire during a clinic appointment. Results: Most survivors failed to attain the recommended level of PA (79%) or exceeded an average of 8 h of daily SB (42%). Access to internet and text messaging capabilities were high (70%), yet few survivors had access to smartphones or tablets (< 40%) or reported interest in using digital tools to improve PA or reduce SB (< 30%). Digital PA and SB interventions were more acceptable to younger survivors, survivors reporting more SB, and survivors engaging in more PA. The monetary value ascribed to digital health interventions did not differ as a function of mode of delivery (i.e., text messages, web, e-mail, tablet computer apps, or smartphone apps). Conclusions: Older GI cancer survivors can benefit from interventions to increase PA and decrease SB. Interest in such interventions was moderate and the acceptability of digital health tools for these interventions was limited. At the present time, behavioral interventions for older GI cancer survivors should not be delivered exclusively through digital tools and strategies to improve adoption of various technologies should be implemented when using these tools to modify PA and SB.

AB - Purpose: This study aimed to characterize physical activity (PA) and sedentary behavior (SB) profiles in older gastrointestinal (GI) cancer survivors, assess their interest in interventions to modify these behaviors, and evaluate the acceptability of digital tools for delivering interventions to modify these behaviors. Methods: Survivors (M = 65 years) from an outpatient survivorship clinic at the Penn State Cancer Institute completed a questionnaire during a clinic appointment. Results: Most survivors failed to attain the recommended level of PA (79%) or exceeded an average of 8 h of daily SB (42%). Access to internet and text messaging capabilities were high (70%), yet few survivors had access to smartphones or tablets (< 40%) or reported interest in using digital tools to improve PA or reduce SB (< 30%). Digital PA and SB interventions were more acceptable to younger survivors, survivors reporting more SB, and survivors engaging in more PA. The monetary value ascribed to digital health interventions did not differ as a function of mode of delivery (i.e., text messages, web, e-mail, tablet computer apps, or smartphone apps). Conclusions: Older GI cancer survivors can benefit from interventions to increase PA and decrease SB. Interest in such interventions was moderate and the acceptability of digital health tools for these interventions was limited. At the present time, behavioral interventions for older GI cancer survivors should not be delivered exclusively through digital tools and strategies to improve adoption of various technologies should be implemented when using these tools to modify PA and SB.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85048631385&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85048631385&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1007/s12029-018-0128-x

DO - 10.1007/s12029-018-0128-x

M3 - Article

C2 - 29911290

AN - SCOPUS:85048631385

SP - 1

EP - 6

JO - Journal of Gastrointestinal Cancer

JF - Journal of Gastrointestinal Cancer

SN - 1941-6628

ER -