Physician support of HPV vaccination school-entry requirements

Sophia Califano, William Calo, Morris Weinberger, Melissa B. Gilkey, Noel T. Brewer

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

ABSTRACT: School-entry requirements in the US have led to high coverage for several vaccines, but few states and jurisdictions have adopted these policies for human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination. Because physicians play a key role in advocating for vaccination policies, we assessed physician support of requiring HPV vaccine for school entry and correlates of this support. Participants were a national sample of 775 physicians who provide primary care, including vaccines, to adolescents. Physicians completed an online survey in 2014 that assessed their support for school-entry requirements for HPV vaccination of 11 and 12 y olds. We used multivariable logistic regression to assess correlates of support for these requirements. The majority of physicians (74%) supported some form of school-entry requirements, with or without opt-out provisions. When opt-out provisions were not specified, 47% agreed that laws requiring HPV vaccination for school attendance were a “good idea.” Physicians more often agreed with requirements, without opt-out provisions, if they: had more years in practice (OR=1.49; 95% CI: 1.09-2.04), gave higher quality HPV vaccine recommendations (OR=2.06; 95% CI: 1.45-2.93), believed that having requirements for Tdap, but not HPV, vaccination undermined its importance (OR=3.33; 95% CI: 2.26-4.9), and believed HPV vaccination was as or more important than other adolescent vaccinations (OR=2.30; 95% CI: 1.65-3.18). In conclusion, we found that many physicians supported school-entry requirements for HPV vaccination. More research is needed to investigate the extent to which opt-out provisions might weaken or strengthen physician support of HPV vaccination school-entry requirements.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1626-1632
Number of pages7
JournalHuman Vaccines and Immunotherapeutics
Volume12
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 2 2016

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Vaccination
Physicians
Papillomavirus Vaccines
Vaccines
Human papillomavirus 11
Primary Health Care
Logistic Models
Research

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Immunology and Allergy
  • Immunology
  • Pharmacology

Cite this

Califano, Sophia ; Calo, William ; Weinberger, Morris ; Gilkey, Melissa B. ; Brewer, Noel T. / Physician support of HPV vaccination school-entry requirements. In: Human Vaccines and Immunotherapeutics. 2016 ; Vol. 12, No. 6. pp. 1626-1632.
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Physician support of HPV vaccination school-entry requirements. / Califano, Sophia; Calo, William; Weinberger, Morris; Gilkey, Melissa B.; Brewer, Noel T.

In: Human Vaccines and Immunotherapeutics, Vol. 12, No. 6, 02.06.2016, p. 1626-1632.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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