Picture Detection in Rapid Serial Visual Presentation: Features or Identity?

Mary C. Potter, Brad Wyble, Rijuta Pandav, Jennifer Olejarczyk

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

20 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

A pictured object can be readily detected in a rapid serial visual presentation sequence when the target is specified by a superordinate category name such as animal or vehicle. Are category features the initial basis for detection, with identification of the specific object occurring in a second stage (Evans & Treisman, 2005), or is identification of the object the basis for detection? When 2 targets in the same superordinate category are presented successively (lag 1), only the identification-first hypothesis predicts lag 1 sparing of the second target. The results of 2 experiments with novel pictures and a wide range of categories supported the identification-first hypothesis and a transient-attention model of lag 1 sparing and the attentional blink (Wyble, Bowman, & Potter, 2009).

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1486-1494
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of Experimental Psychology: Human Perception and Performance
Volume36
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2010

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All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Experimental and Cognitive Psychology
  • Arts and Humanities (miscellaneous)
  • Behavioral Neuroscience

Cite this

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Picture Detection in Rapid Serial Visual Presentation : Features or Identity? / Potter, Mary C.; Wyble, Brad; Pandav, Rijuta; Olejarczyk, Jennifer.

In: Journal of Experimental Psychology: Human Perception and Performance, Vol. 36, No. 6, 01.12.2010, p. 1486-1494.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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