Pilot clinical study of the effects of ginger root extract on eicosanoids in colonic mucosa of subjects at increased risk for colorectal cancer

Suzanna M. Zick, D. Kim Turgeon, Jianwei Ren, Mack Ruffin, Benjamin D. Wright, Ananda Sen, Zora Djuric, Dean E. Brenner

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

17 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Colorectal cancer (CRC) remains a significant cause of mortality. Inhibitors of cyclooxygenase (COX) and thus prostaglandin E2, are promising CRC preventives, but have significant toxicities. Ginger has been shown to inhibit COX, to decrease the incidence and multiplicity of adenomas, and decrease PGE2 concentrations in subjects at normal risk for CRC. This study was conducted to determine the effects of 2.0g/d of ginger given orally on the levels of PGE2, leukotriene B4 (LTB4), 13-hydroxy-octadecadienoic acids, and 5-, 12-, & 15-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid, in the colonic mucosa of subjects at increased risk for CRC. We randomized 20 subjects to 2.0g/d ginger or placebo for 28 d. At baseline and Day 28, a flexible sigmoidoscopy was used to obtain colon biopsies. A liquid chromatography mass spectrometry method was used to determine eicosanoid levels in the biopsies, and levels were expressed per amount of protein or free arachidonic acid (AA). There was a significant decrease in AA between baseline and Day 28 (P=0.05) and significant increase in LTB4 (P=0.04) when normalized to protein, in subjects treated with ginger versus placebo. No other changes in eicosanoids were observed. There was no difference between the groups in total adverse events (AE; P=0.06). Ginger lacks the ability to decrease eicosanoid levels in people at increased risk for CRC. Ginger did appear to be both tolerable and safe; and could have chemopreventive effects through other mechanisms. Further investigation should focus on other markers of CRC risk in those at increased CRC risk.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)908-915
Number of pages8
JournalMolecular Carcinogenesis
Volume54
Issue number9
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 1 2015

Fingerprint

Ginger
Eicosanoids
Colorectal Neoplasms
Mucous Membrane
Dinoprostone
Leukotriene B4
Arachidonic Acid
Placebos
Biopsy
Hydroxyeicosatetraenoic Acids
Sigmoidoscopy
Hydroxy Acids
Cyclooxygenase Inhibitors
Prostaglandin-Endoperoxide Synthases
Clinical Studies
Liquid Chromatography
Adenoma
Mass Spectrometry
Colon
Proteins

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Molecular Biology
  • Cancer Research

Cite this

Zick, Suzanna M. ; Turgeon, D. Kim ; Ren, Jianwei ; Ruffin, Mack ; Wright, Benjamin D. ; Sen, Ananda ; Djuric, Zora ; Brenner, Dean E. / Pilot clinical study of the effects of ginger root extract on eicosanoids in colonic mucosa of subjects at increased risk for colorectal cancer. In: Molecular Carcinogenesis. 2015 ; Vol. 54, No. 9. pp. 908-915.
@article{7f6e7befd4ad43ce947611706cd0daa4,
title = "Pilot clinical study of the effects of ginger root extract on eicosanoids in colonic mucosa of subjects at increased risk for colorectal cancer",
abstract = "Colorectal cancer (CRC) remains a significant cause of mortality. Inhibitors of cyclooxygenase (COX) and thus prostaglandin E2, are promising CRC preventives, but have significant toxicities. Ginger has been shown to inhibit COX, to decrease the incidence and multiplicity of adenomas, and decrease PGE2 concentrations in subjects at normal risk for CRC. This study was conducted to determine the effects of 2.0g/d of ginger given orally on the levels of PGE2, leukotriene B4 (LTB4), 13-hydroxy-octadecadienoic acids, and 5-, 12-, & 15-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid, in the colonic mucosa of subjects at increased risk for CRC. We randomized 20 subjects to 2.0g/d ginger or placebo for 28 d. At baseline and Day 28, a flexible sigmoidoscopy was used to obtain colon biopsies. A liquid chromatography mass spectrometry method was used to determine eicosanoid levels in the biopsies, and levels were expressed per amount of protein or free arachidonic acid (AA). There was a significant decrease in AA between baseline and Day 28 (P=0.05) and significant increase in LTB4 (P=0.04) when normalized to protein, in subjects treated with ginger versus placebo. No other changes in eicosanoids were observed. There was no difference between the groups in total adverse events (AE; P=0.06). Ginger lacks the ability to decrease eicosanoid levels in people at increased risk for CRC. Ginger did appear to be both tolerable and safe; and could have chemopreventive effects through other mechanisms. Further investigation should focus on other markers of CRC risk in those at increased CRC risk.",
author = "Zick, {Suzanna M.} and Turgeon, {D. Kim} and Jianwei Ren and Mack Ruffin and Wright, {Benjamin D.} and Ananda Sen and Zora Djuric and Brenner, {Dean E.}",
year = "2015",
month = "9",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1002/mc.22163",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "54",
pages = "908--915",
journal = "Molecular Carcinogenesis",
issn = "0899-1987",
publisher = "Wiley-Liss Inc.",
number = "9",

}

Pilot clinical study of the effects of ginger root extract on eicosanoids in colonic mucosa of subjects at increased risk for colorectal cancer. / Zick, Suzanna M.; Turgeon, D. Kim; Ren, Jianwei; Ruffin, Mack; Wright, Benjamin D.; Sen, Ananda; Djuric, Zora; Brenner, Dean E.

In: Molecular Carcinogenesis, Vol. 54, No. 9, 01.09.2015, p. 908-915.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Pilot clinical study of the effects of ginger root extract on eicosanoids in colonic mucosa of subjects at increased risk for colorectal cancer

AU - Zick, Suzanna M.

AU - Turgeon, D. Kim

AU - Ren, Jianwei

AU - Ruffin, Mack

AU - Wright, Benjamin D.

AU - Sen, Ananda

AU - Djuric, Zora

AU - Brenner, Dean E.

PY - 2015/9/1

Y1 - 2015/9/1

N2 - Colorectal cancer (CRC) remains a significant cause of mortality. Inhibitors of cyclooxygenase (COX) and thus prostaglandin E2, are promising CRC preventives, but have significant toxicities. Ginger has been shown to inhibit COX, to decrease the incidence and multiplicity of adenomas, and decrease PGE2 concentrations in subjects at normal risk for CRC. This study was conducted to determine the effects of 2.0g/d of ginger given orally on the levels of PGE2, leukotriene B4 (LTB4), 13-hydroxy-octadecadienoic acids, and 5-, 12-, & 15-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid, in the colonic mucosa of subjects at increased risk for CRC. We randomized 20 subjects to 2.0g/d ginger or placebo for 28 d. At baseline and Day 28, a flexible sigmoidoscopy was used to obtain colon biopsies. A liquid chromatography mass spectrometry method was used to determine eicosanoid levels in the biopsies, and levels were expressed per amount of protein or free arachidonic acid (AA). There was a significant decrease in AA between baseline and Day 28 (P=0.05) and significant increase in LTB4 (P=0.04) when normalized to protein, in subjects treated with ginger versus placebo. No other changes in eicosanoids were observed. There was no difference between the groups in total adverse events (AE; P=0.06). Ginger lacks the ability to decrease eicosanoid levels in people at increased risk for CRC. Ginger did appear to be both tolerable and safe; and could have chemopreventive effects through other mechanisms. Further investigation should focus on other markers of CRC risk in those at increased CRC risk.

AB - Colorectal cancer (CRC) remains a significant cause of mortality. Inhibitors of cyclooxygenase (COX) and thus prostaglandin E2, are promising CRC preventives, but have significant toxicities. Ginger has been shown to inhibit COX, to decrease the incidence and multiplicity of adenomas, and decrease PGE2 concentrations in subjects at normal risk for CRC. This study was conducted to determine the effects of 2.0g/d of ginger given orally on the levels of PGE2, leukotriene B4 (LTB4), 13-hydroxy-octadecadienoic acids, and 5-, 12-, & 15-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid, in the colonic mucosa of subjects at increased risk for CRC. We randomized 20 subjects to 2.0g/d ginger or placebo for 28 d. At baseline and Day 28, a flexible sigmoidoscopy was used to obtain colon biopsies. A liquid chromatography mass spectrometry method was used to determine eicosanoid levels in the biopsies, and levels were expressed per amount of protein or free arachidonic acid (AA). There was a significant decrease in AA between baseline and Day 28 (P=0.05) and significant increase in LTB4 (P=0.04) when normalized to protein, in subjects treated with ginger versus placebo. No other changes in eicosanoids were observed. There was no difference between the groups in total adverse events (AE; P=0.06). Ginger lacks the ability to decrease eicosanoid levels in people at increased risk for CRC. Ginger did appear to be both tolerable and safe; and could have chemopreventive effects through other mechanisms. Further investigation should focus on other markers of CRC risk in those at increased CRC risk.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84938961535&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84938961535&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1002/mc.22163

DO - 10.1002/mc.22163

M3 - Article

C2 - 24760534

AN - SCOPUS:84938961535

VL - 54

SP - 908

EP - 915

JO - Molecular Carcinogenesis

JF - Molecular Carcinogenesis

SN - 0899-1987

IS - 9

ER -