Pilot feedback for an automated planning aid system in the cockpit

Robert Watts, Panagiotis Tsiotras, Eric Johnson

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

It is the primary responsibility of the airline pilot to safely complete a flight plan and safely land the airplane. This task can become very difficult in the face of an onboard emergency. One of the challenging tasks faced by the pilots in case of an emergency is the determination of an appropriate landing site as well as the development of a safe trajectory to reach that site. An Automated Planning Aid (APA) can assist the pilot with the tasks of selecting a landing site and developing a suitable trajectory to land. In order to evaluate such an APA, a survey of airline pilots was conducted during the late summer of 2008. The participants were presented with several questions related to the task of planning a path during a performance altering emergency, a non-performance altering emergency and an unforeseen emergency. Participants were also presented with questions about how they would prefer to interact with an APA in the cockpit and the circumstances under which such a device might be most useful. The results of the survey showed that time was the most important criterion to consider, however the methods pilots use to complete the landing site selection and trajectory development tasks vary with the type of emergency and the pilot's familiarity with the circumstances. The results of the survey are used to understand the mental processes currently used by the pilots to complete the path planning task as well as to provide insights to how an APA could be most useful during an onboard emergency.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publication28th Digital Avionics Systems Conference
Subtitle of host publicationModernization of Avionics and ATM-Perspectives from the Air and Ground, DASC 2009 - Proceedings
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2009
Event28th Digital Avionics Systems Conference: Modernization of Avionics and ATM-Perspectives from the Air and Ground, DASC 2009 - Orlando, FL, United States
Duration: Oct 25 2009Oct 29 2009

Publication series

NameAIAA/IEEE Digital Avionics Systems Conference - Proceedings

Other

Other28th Digital Avionics Systems Conference: Modernization of Avionics and ATM-Perspectives from the Air and Ground, DASC 2009
CountryUnited States
CityOrlando, FL
Period10/25/0910/29/09

Fingerprint

Feedback
Planning
Landing
Trajectories
Site selection
Motion planning
Aircraft

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Aerospace Engineering
  • Electrical and Electronic Engineering

Cite this

Watts, R., Tsiotras, P., & Johnson, E. (2009). Pilot feedback for an automated planning aid system in the cockpit. In 28th Digital Avionics Systems Conference: Modernization of Avionics and ATM-Perspectives from the Air and Ground, DASC 2009 - Proceedings (AIAA/IEEE Digital Avionics Systems Conference - Proceedings). https://doi.org/10.1109/DASC.2009.5347472
Watts, Robert ; Tsiotras, Panagiotis ; Johnson, Eric. / Pilot feedback for an automated planning aid system in the cockpit. 28th Digital Avionics Systems Conference: Modernization of Avionics and ATM-Perspectives from the Air and Ground, DASC 2009 - Proceedings. 2009. (AIAA/IEEE Digital Avionics Systems Conference - Proceedings).
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Watts, R, Tsiotras, P & Johnson, E 2009, Pilot feedback for an automated planning aid system in the cockpit. in 28th Digital Avionics Systems Conference: Modernization of Avionics and ATM-Perspectives from the Air and Ground, DASC 2009 - Proceedings. AIAA/IEEE Digital Avionics Systems Conference - Proceedings, 28th Digital Avionics Systems Conference: Modernization of Avionics and ATM-Perspectives from the Air and Ground, DASC 2009, Orlando, FL, United States, 10/25/09. https://doi.org/10.1109/DASC.2009.5347472

Pilot feedback for an automated planning aid system in the cockpit. / Watts, Robert; Tsiotras, Panagiotis; Johnson, Eric.

28th Digital Avionics Systems Conference: Modernization of Avionics and ATM-Perspectives from the Air and Ground, DASC 2009 - Proceedings. 2009. (AIAA/IEEE Digital Avionics Systems Conference - Proceedings).

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

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Watts R, Tsiotras P, Johnson E. Pilot feedback for an automated planning aid system in the cockpit. In 28th Digital Avionics Systems Conference: Modernization of Avionics and ATM-Perspectives from the Air and Ground, DASC 2009 - Proceedings. 2009. (AIAA/IEEE Digital Avionics Systems Conference - Proceedings). https://doi.org/10.1109/DASC.2009.5347472