Pilot's information use during TCAS events, and relationship to compliance to TCAS resolution advisories

Amy Pritchett, Elizabeth S. Fleming, William P. Cleveland, Vlad M. Popescu, Dhruv A. Thakkar, Jonathan J. Zoetrum

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

7 Scopus citations

Abstract

The Traffic alert and Collision Avoidance System (TCAS) is intended to serve as a backup, redundant system that alerts and advises the pilot when all other methods of aircraft separation assurance fail. A flight simulator experiment examined pilot responses to TCAS advisories in a full air traffic environment. This paper discusses two analyses of the pilots' use of information within their environment. The first analysis examined air traffic communications manipulated according to four conditions: traffic call-outs, instructions conflicting with the TCAS advised avoidance maneuver, the ability to over-hear relevant partyline information, and no relevant communications. The second analysis used data from an eye tracker to identify when the pilot examined the traffic situation display provided by TCAS. These patterns of information use are then compared with pilot compliance to the Resolution Advisories provided by TCAS.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationProceedings of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society 56th Annual Meeting, HFES 2012
Pages26-30
Number of pages5
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2012
EventProceedings of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society 56th Annual Meeting, HFES 2012 - Boston, MA, United States
Duration: Oct 22 2012Oct 26 2012

Publication series

NameProceedings of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society
ISSN (Print)1071-1813

Other

OtherProceedings of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society 56th Annual Meeting, HFES 2012
CountryUnited States
CityBoston, MA
Period10/22/1210/26/12

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Human Factors and Ergonomics

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