Places of protest in Putin’s Russia: Pussy Riot’s Punk Prayer and show trial

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Abstract

In spring 2012 the Russian feminist art collective Pussy Riot became world famous when five of its members were arrested for their “Punk Prayer for Freedom” in the Cathedral of Christ the Savior in central Moscow. Western media swiftly embraced the group and celebrated it as an icon of youthful female rebellion against Putin’s authoritarian regime. Yet the Western reception largely obscured the “regional accent” of the group’s protest rhetoric. This article seeks to restore this regional accent by foregrounding the rhetorical significance of place in Pussy Riot’s acts of protest.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)227-247
Number of pages21
JournalAdvances in the History of Rhetoric
Volume18
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - 2015

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Language and Linguistics
  • Communication
  • Linguistics and Language
  • Literature and Literary Theory

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