Plant grafting: how genetic exchange promotes vascular reconnection

Jing Wang, Libo Jiang, Rongling Wu

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

17 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Grafting has been widely used to improve horticultural traits. It has also served increasingly as a tool to investigate the long-distance transport of molecules that is an essential part for key biological processes. Many studies have revealed the molecular mechanisms of graft-induced phenotypic variation in anatomy, morphology and production. Here, we review the phenomena and their underlying mechanisms by which macromolecules, including RNA, protein, and even DNA, are transported between scions and rootstocks via vascular tissues. We further propose a conceptual framework that characterizes and quantifies the driving mechanisms of scion–rootstock interactions toward vascular reconnection and regeneration.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)56-65
Number of pages10
JournalNew Phytologist
Volume214
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 1 2017

Fingerprint

vascular tissues
scions
grafting (plants)
phenotypic variation
blood vessels
rootstocks
Blood Vessels
RNA
Biological Phenomena
DNA
Regeneration
Anatomy
proteins
Transplants
Proteins

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Physiology
  • Plant Science

Cite this

Wang, Jing ; Jiang, Libo ; Wu, Rongling. / Plant grafting : how genetic exchange promotes vascular reconnection. In: New Phytologist. 2017 ; Vol. 214, No. 1. pp. 56-65.
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Plant grafting : how genetic exchange promotes vascular reconnection. / Wang, Jing; Jiang, Libo; Wu, Rongling.

In: New Phytologist, Vol. 214, No. 1, 01.04.2017, p. 56-65.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

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