Plasma C-Reactive Protein and Homocysteine Concentrations Are Related to Frequent Fruit and Vegetable Intake in Hispanic and Non-Hispanic White Elders

Xiang Gao, Odilia I. Bermudez, Katherine L. Tucker

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

109 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Elevated C-reactive protein (CRP) and plasma total homocysteine (Hcy) were recently identified as risk factors for cardiovascular disease. However, few studies have related fruit and vegetable consumption to these markers of inflammation and B vitamin deficiency, particularly in the Hispanic population. We examined the relation of fruit and vegetable intake with plasma CRP and Hcy concentrations in a cross-sectional study. Subjects were 445 Hispanic elders and 154 neighborhood-based non-Hispanic white elders living in Massachusetts. Diet was assessed with a FFQ designed for this population. There were significant inverse dose-response associations between fruit and vegetable intake and plasma CRP (P for trend = 0.010) and Hcy (P for trend = 0.033) concentrations, after adjustment for potential confounders. The prevalence of high plasma CRP (> 10 mg/L), and high Hcy (>10.4 μmol/L for women and > 11.4 μmol/L for men), was significantly greater among subjects in the lowest quartile of fruit and vegetable consumption relative to those in the highest quartile, 17.9 vs. 9.1% and 58.7 vs. 44.4%, respectively. With each additional serving of fruit and vegetable intake, adjusted odd ratios for high plasma CRP and Hcy were 0.79 (95% CI: 0.65 to 0.97) and 0.83 (95% CI: 0.72 to 0.96), respectively. Greater frequency of fruit and vegetable intake was associated with significantly lower plasma CRP and Hcy concentrations. Because both of these metabolites are known risk factors for CVD, these findings contribute to the evidence that a higher intake of fruit and vegetables may reduce the risk of CVD.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)913-918
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Nutrition
Volume134
Issue number4
StatePublished - Apr 1 2004

Fingerprint

homocysteine
C-reactive protein
vegetable consumption
fruit consumption
Homocysteine
Hispanic Americans
Vegetables
C-Reactive Protein
blood proteins
Blood Proteins
Fruit
vitamin B deficiency
Vitamin B Deficiency
risk factors
cross-sectional studies
odds ratio
Population
cardiovascular diseases
dose response
Cardiovascular Diseases

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Nutrition and Dietetics

Cite this

@article{4f570007473949b5930b4a4390d846aa,
title = "Plasma C-Reactive Protein and Homocysteine Concentrations Are Related to Frequent Fruit and Vegetable Intake in Hispanic and Non-Hispanic White Elders",
abstract = "Elevated C-reactive protein (CRP) and plasma total homocysteine (Hcy) were recently identified as risk factors for cardiovascular disease. However, few studies have related fruit and vegetable consumption to these markers of inflammation and B vitamin deficiency, particularly in the Hispanic population. We examined the relation of fruit and vegetable intake with plasma CRP and Hcy concentrations in a cross-sectional study. Subjects were 445 Hispanic elders and 154 neighborhood-based non-Hispanic white elders living in Massachusetts. Diet was assessed with a FFQ designed for this population. There were significant inverse dose-response associations between fruit and vegetable intake and plasma CRP (P for trend = 0.010) and Hcy (P for trend = 0.033) concentrations, after adjustment for potential confounders. The prevalence of high plasma CRP (> 10 mg/L), and high Hcy (>10.4 μmol/L for women and > 11.4 μmol/L for men), was significantly greater among subjects in the lowest quartile of fruit and vegetable consumption relative to those in the highest quartile, 17.9 vs. 9.1{\%} and 58.7 vs. 44.4{\%}, respectively. With each additional serving of fruit and vegetable intake, adjusted odd ratios for high plasma CRP and Hcy were 0.79 (95{\%} CI: 0.65 to 0.97) and 0.83 (95{\%} CI: 0.72 to 0.96), respectively. Greater frequency of fruit and vegetable intake was associated with significantly lower plasma CRP and Hcy concentrations. Because both of these metabolites are known risk factors for CVD, these findings contribute to the evidence that a higher intake of fruit and vegetables may reduce the risk of CVD.",
author = "Xiang Gao and Bermudez, {Odilia I.} and Tucker, {Katherine L.}",
year = "2004",
month = "4",
day = "1",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "134",
pages = "913--918",
journal = "Journal of Nutrition",
issn = "0022-3166",
publisher = "American Society for Nutrition",
number = "4",

}

Plasma C-Reactive Protein and Homocysteine Concentrations Are Related to Frequent Fruit and Vegetable Intake in Hispanic and Non-Hispanic White Elders. / Gao, Xiang; Bermudez, Odilia I.; Tucker, Katherine L.

In: Journal of Nutrition, Vol. 134, No. 4, 01.04.2004, p. 913-918.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Plasma C-Reactive Protein and Homocysteine Concentrations Are Related to Frequent Fruit and Vegetable Intake in Hispanic and Non-Hispanic White Elders

AU - Gao, Xiang

AU - Bermudez, Odilia I.

AU - Tucker, Katherine L.

PY - 2004/4/1

Y1 - 2004/4/1

N2 - Elevated C-reactive protein (CRP) and plasma total homocysteine (Hcy) were recently identified as risk factors for cardiovascular disease. However, few studies have related fruit and vegetable consumption to these markers of inflammation and B vitamin deficiency, particularly in the Hispanic population. We examined the relation of fruit and vegetable intake with plasma CRP and Hcy concentrations in a cross-sectional study. Subjects were 445 Hispanic elders and 154 neighborhood-based non-Hispanic white elders living in Massachusetts. Diet was assessed with a FFQ designed for this population. There were significant inverse dose-response associations between fruit and vegetable intake and plasma CRP (P for trend = 0.010) and Hcy (P for trend = 0.033) concentrations, after adjustment for potential confounders. The prevalence of high plasma CRP (> 10 mg/L), and high Hcy (>10.4 μmol/L for women and > 11.4 μmol/L for men), was significantly greater among subjects in the lowest quartile of fruit and vegetable consumption relative to those in the highest quartile, 17.9 vs. 9.1% and 58.7 vs. 44.4%, respectively. With each additional serving of fruit and vegetable intake, adjusted odd ratios for high plasma CRP and Hcy were 0.79 (95% CI: 0.65 to 0.97) and 0.83 (95% CI: 0.72 to 0.96), respectively. Greater frequency of fruit and vegetable intake was associated with significantly lower plasma CRP and Hcy concentrations. Because both of these metabolites are known risk factors for CVD, these findings contribute to the evidence that a higher intake of fruit and vegetables may reduce the risk of CVD.

AB - Elevated C-reactive protein (CRP) and plasma total homocysteine (Hcy) were recently identified as risk factors for cardiovascular disease. However, few studies have related fruit and vegetable consumption to these markers of inflammation and B vitamin deficiency, particularly in the Hispanic population. We examined the relation of fruit and vegetable intake with plasma CRP and Hcy concentrations in a cross-sectional study. Subjects were 445 Hispanic elders and 154 neighborhood-based non-Hispanic white elders living in Massachusetts. Diet was assessed with a FFQ designed for this population. There were significant inverse dose-response associations between fruit and vegetable intake and plasma CRP (P for trend = 0.010) and Hcy (P for trend = 0.033) concentrations, after adjustment for potential confounders. The prevalence of high plasma CRP (> 10 mg/L), and high Hcy (>10.4 μmol/L for women and > 11.4 μmol/L for men), was significantly greater among subjects in the lowest quartile of fruit and vegetable consumption relative to those in the highest quartile, 17.9 vs. 9.1% and 58.7 vs. 44.4%, respectively. With each additional serving of fruit and vegetable intake, adjusted odd ratios for high plasma CRP and Hcy were 0.79 (95% CI: 0.65 to 0.97) and 0.83 (95% CI: 0.72 to 0.96), respectively. Greater frequency of fruit and vegetable intake was associated with significantly lower plasma CRP and Hcy concentrations. Because both of these metabolites are known risk factors for CVD, these findings contribute to the evidence that a higher intake of fruit and vegetables may reduce the risk of CVD.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=1842582865&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=1842582865&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Article

C2 - 15051846

AN - SCOPUS:1842582865

VL - 134

SP - 913

EP - 918

JO - Journal of Nutrition

JF - Journal of Nutrition

SN - 0022-3166

IS - 4

ER -