Plasma trans-fatty acid concentrations in fasting adults declined from NHANES 1999-2000 to 2009-2010

Hubert W. Vesper, Samuel P. Caudill, Heather C. Kuiper, Quanhe Yang, Namanjeet Ahluwalia, David A. Lacher, James L. Pirkle

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

Background: The consumption of trans fatty acids (TFAs) is associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular disease, and reducing their consumption is a major public health objective. Food intake studies have provided estimates for TFA concentrations in the US population; however, there is a need for data on TFA blood concentrations in the population. Objective: The objective of this study was to determine plasma TFA concentrations in a nationally representative group of fasted adults in the US population in NHANES samples from 1999-2000 and 2009-2010. Design: Four major TFAs [palmitelaidic acid (C16:1n-7t), trans vaccenic acid (C18:1n-7t), elaidic acid (C18:1n-9t), and linoelaidic acid (C18:2n-6t,9t)] were measured in plasma in 1613 subjects from NHANES 1999-2000 and 2462 subjects from NHANES 2009-2010 by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Geometric means and distribution percentiles were calculated for each TFA and their sum by age, sex, and race/ethnicity (non-Hispanic white, non-Hispanic black, Mexican American), and covariate-adjusted geometric means were computed by using a model that included these demographic and other dietary factors, as well as survey year and any significant interaction terms. Results: These nationally representative data for the adult US population show that TFA concentrations were 54% lower in NHANES 2009-2010 than in NHANES 1999-2000. Covariate-adjusted geometric means for the sum of the 4 TFAs were 81.4 μmol/L (95% CI: 77.3, 85.6 μmol/L) and 37.8 μmol/L (95% CI: 36.4, 39.4 μmol/L) in NHANES 1999-2000 and 2009-2010, respectively. Even with the large decline in TFA concentrations, differences between demographic subgroups were comparable in the 2 surveys. Conclusion: The results indicate an overall reduction in TFA concentrations in the US population and provide a valuable baseline to evaluate the impact of the recent regulation categorizing TFAs as food additives.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1063-1069
Number of pages7
JournalAmerican Journal of Clinical Nutrition
Volume105
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - May 1 2017

Fingerprint

Trans Fatty Acids
Nutrition Surveys
Fasting
Population
Demography
Food Additives
Linoleic Acid
Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry
Cardiovascular Diseases
Public Health
Eating

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Nutrition and Dietetics

Cite this

Vesper, H. W., Caudill, S. P., Kuiper, H. C., Yang, Q., Ahluwalia, N., Lacher, D. A., & Pirkle, J. L. (2017). Plasma trans-fatty acid concentrations in fasting adults declined from NHANES 1999-2000 to 2009-2010. American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, 105(5), 1063-1069. https://doi.org/10.3945/ajcn.116.141622
Vesper, Hubert W. ; Caudill, Samuel P. ; Kuiper, Heather C. ; Yang, Quanhe ; Ahluwalia, Namanjeet ; Lacher, David A. ; Pirkle, James L. / Plasma trans-fatty acid concentrations in fasting adults declined from NHANES 1999-2000 to 2009-2010. In: American Journal of Clinical Nutrition. 2017 ; Vol. 105, No. 5. pp. 1063-1069.
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abstract = "Background: The consumption of trans fatty acids (TFAs) is associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular disease, and reducing their consumption is a major public health objective. Food intake studies have provided estimates for TFA concentrations in the US population; however, there is a need for data on TFA blood concentrations in the population. Objective: The objective of this study was to determine plasma TFA concentrations in a nationally representative group of fasted adults in the US population in NHANES samples from 1999-2000 and 2009-2010. Design: Four major TFAs [palmitelaidic acid (C16:1n-7t), trans vaccenic acid (C18:1n-7t), elaidic acid (C18:1n-9t), and linoelaidic acid (C18:2n-6t,9t)] were measured in plasma in 1613 subjects from NHANES 1999-2000 and 2462 subjects from NHANES 2009-2010 by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Geometric means and distribution percentiles were calculated for each TFA and their sum by age, sex, and race/ethnicity (non-Hispanic white, non-Hispanic black, Mexican American), and covariate-adjusted geometric means were computed by using a model that included these demographic and other dietary factors, as well as survey year and any significant interaction terms. Results: These nationally representative data for the adult US population show that TFA concentrations were 54{\%} lower in NHANES 2009-2010 than in NHANES 1999-2000. Covariate-adjusted geometric means for the sum of the 4 TFAs were 81.4 μmol/L (95{\%} CI: 77.3, 85.6 μmol/L) and 37.8 μmol/L (95{\%} CI: 36.4, 39.4 μmol/L) in NHANES 1999-2000 and 2009-2010, respectively. Even with the large decline in TFA concentrations, differences between demographic subgroups were comparable in the 2 surveys. Conclusion: The results indicate an overall reduction in TFA concentrations in the US population and provide a valuable baseline to evaluate the impact of the recent regulation categorizing TFAs as food additives.",
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Vesper, HW, Caudill, SP, Kuiper, HC, Yang, Q, Ahluwalia, N, Lacher, DA & Pirkle, JL 2017, 'Plasma trans-fatty acid concentrations in fasting adults declined from NHANES 1999-2000 to 2009-2010', American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, vol. 105, no. 5, pp. 1063-1069. https://doi.org/10.3945/ajcn.116.141622

Plasma trans-fatty acid concentrations in fasting adults declined from NHANES 1999-2000 to 2009-2010. / Vesper, Hubert W.; Caudill, Samuel P.; Kuiper, Heather C.; Yang, Quanhe; Ahluwalia, Namanjeet; Lacher, David A.; Pirkle, James L.

In: American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, Vol. 105, No. 5, 01.05.2017, p. 1063-1069.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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T1 - Plasma trans-fatty acid concentrations in fasting adults declined from NHANES 1999-2000 to 2009-2010

AU - Vesper, Hubert W.

AU - Caudill, Samuel P.

AU - Kuiper, Heather C.

AU - Yang, Quanhe

AU - Ahluwalia, Namanjeet

AU - Lacher, David A.

AU - Pirkle, James L.

PY - 2017/5/1

Y1 - 2017/5/1

N2 - Background: The consumption of trans fatty acids (TFAs) is associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular disease, and reducing their consumption is a major public health objective. Food intake studies have provided estimates for TFA concentrations in the US population; however, there is a need for data on TFA blood concentrations in the population. Objective: The objective of this study was to determine plasma TFA concentrations in a nationally representative group of fasted adults in the US population in NHANES samples from 1999-2000 and 2009-2010. Design: Four major TFAs [palmitelaidic acid (C16:1n-7t), trans vaccenic acid (C18:1n-7t), elaidic acid (C18:1n-9t), and linoelaidic acid (C18:2n-6t,9t)] were measured in plasma in 1613 subjects from NHANES 1999-2000 and 2462 subjects from NHANES 2009-2010 by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Geometric means and distribution percentiles were calculated for each TFA and their sum by age, sex, and race/ethnicity (non-Hispanic white, non-Hispanic black, Mexican American), and covariate-adjusted geometric means were computed by using a model that included these demographic and other dietary factors, as well as survey year and any significant interaction terms. Results: These nationally representative data for the adult US population show that TFA concentrations were 54% lower in NHANES 2009-2010 than in NHANES 1999-2000. Covariate-adjusted geometric means for the sum of the 4 TFAs were 81.4 μmol/L (95% CI: 77.3, 85.6 μmol/L) and 37.8 μmol/L (95% CI: 36.4, 39.4 μmol/L) in NHANES 1999-2000 and 2009-2010, respectively. Even with the large decline in TFA concentrations, differences between demographic subgroups were comparable in the 2 surveys. Conclusion: The results indicate an overall reduction in TFA concentrations in the US population and provide a valuable baseline to evaluate the impact of the recent regulation categorizing TFAs as food additives.

AB - Background: The consumption of trans fatty acids (TFAs) is associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular disease, and reducing their consumption is a major public health objective. Food intake studies have provided estimates for TFA concentrations in the US population; however, there is a need for data on TFA blood concentrations in the population. Objective: The objective of this study was to determine plasma TFA concentrations in a nationally representative group of fasted adults in the US population in NHANES samples from 1999-2000 and 2009-2010. Design: Four major TFAs [palmitelaidic acid (C16:1n-7t), trans vaccenic acid (C18:1n-7t), elaidic acid (C18:1n-9t), and linoelaidic acid (C18:2n-6t,9t)] were measured in plasma in 1613 subjects from NHANES 1999-2000 and 2462 subjects from NHANES 2009-2010 by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Geometric means and distribution percentiles were calculated for each TFA and their sum by age, sex, and race/ethnicity (non-Hispanic white, non-Hispanic black, Mexican American), and covariate-adjusted geometric means were computed by using a model that included these demographic and other dietary factors, as well as survey year and any significant interaction terms. Results: These nationally representative data for the adult US population show that TFA concentrations were 54% lower in NHANES 2009-2010 than in NHANES 1999-2000. Covariate-adjusted geometric means for the sum of the 4 TFAs were 81.4 μmol/L (95% CI: 77.3, 85.6 μmol/L) and 37.8 μmol/L (95% CI: 36.4, 39.4 μmol/L) in NHANES 1999-2000 and 2009-2010, respectively. Even with the large decline in TFA concentrations, differences between demographic subgroups were comparable in the 2 surveys. Conclusion: The results indicate an overall reduction in TFA concentrations in the US population and provide a valuable baseline to evaluate the impact of the recent regulation categorizing TFAs as food additives.

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