Plasmacytoid dendritic cells, interferon signaling, and FcγR contribute to pathogenesis and therapeutic response in childhood immune thrombocytopenia

Kartik Sehgal, Xiuyang Guo, Srinivas Koduru, Anumeha Shah, Aiping Lin, Xiting Yan, Kavita M. Dhodapkar

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

Immune thrombocytopenia (ITP) is an autoimmune disorder of childhood characterized by immune-mediated destruction of platelets. The mechanisms underlying the pathogenesis of ITP and the therapeutic efficacy of intravenous immunoglobulins (IVIG) in this disorder remain unclear. We show that monocytes from patients with ITP have a distinct gene expression profile, with increased expression of type I interferon response (IR) genes. Plasma from ITP patients had increased levels of several cytokines indicative of immune activation, including an increase in interferon-α. ITP patients also had an increase in plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs) compared to healthy donors. Therapy-induced remission of ITP was associated with abrogation of the IR gene signature in monocytes without reduction in the levels of circulating interferon-α itself. IVIG altered the ratio of activating/inhibitory Fcγ receptors (FcγRs) in vivo primarily by reducing FcγRIII (CD16). The engagement of activating FcγRs was required for IVIG-mediated abrogation of monocyte response to exogenous interferon-α in culture. Moreover, plasma from ITP patients led to activation of monocytes and myeloid DCs in culture with an increase in T cell stimulatory capacity; this activation depended on the engagement of activating FcγRs and interferon-α receptor (IFNAR) and was inhibited by antibody-mediated blockade of these pathways. These data point to a central role of type I interferon in the pathogenesis of ITP and suggest targeting pDCs and blockade of IR as potential therapeutic approaches in this disorder. They also provide evidence for the capacity of IVIG to extinguish IR in vivo, which may contribute to its effects in autoimmunity.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number193ra89
JournalScience Translational Medicine
Volume5
Issue number193
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 10 2013

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Idiopathic Thrombocytopenic Purpura
Dendritic Cells
Interferons
Intravenous Immunoglobulins
Fc Receptors
Monocytes
Interferon Type I
Therapeutics
Interferon Receptors
Autoimmunity
Transcriptome
Genes
Blood Platelets
Tissue Donors
Cytokines
T-Lymphocytes
Antibodies

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

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title = "Plasmacytoid dendritic cells, interferon signaling, and FcγR contribute to pathogenesis and therapeutic response in childhood immune thrombocytopenia",
abstract = "Immune thrombocytopenia (ITP) is an autoimmune disorder of childhood characterized by immune-mediated destruction of platelets. The mechanisms underlying the pathogenesis of ITP and the therapeutic efficacy of intravenous immunoglobulins (IVIG) in this disorder remain unclear. We show that monocytes from patients with ITP have a distinct gene expression profile, with increased expression of type I interferon response (IR) genes. Plasma from ITP patients had increased levels of several cytokines indicative of immune activation, including an increase in interferon-α. ITP patients also had an increase in plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs) compared to healthy donors. Therapy-induced remission of ITP was associated with abrogation of the IR gene signature in monocytes without reduction in the levels of circulating interferon-α itself. IVIG altered the ratio of activating/inhibitory Fcγ receptors (FcγRs) in vivo primarily by reducing FcγRIII (CD16). The engagement of activating FcγRs was required for IVIG-mediated abrogation of monocyte response to exogenous interferon-α in culture. Moreover, plasma from ITP patients led to activation of monocytes and myeloid DCs in culture with an increase in T cell stimulatory capacity; this activation depended on the engagement of activating FcγRs and interferon-α receptor (IFNAR) and was inhibited by antibody-mediated blockade of these pathways. These data point to a central role of type I interferon in the pathogenesis of ITP and suggest targeting pDCs and blockade of IR as potential therapeutic approaches in this disorder. They also provide evidence for the capacity of IVIG to extinguish IR in vivo, which may contribute to its effects in autoimmunity.",
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Plasmacytoid dendritic cells, interferon signaling, and FcγR contribute to pathogenesis and therapeutic response in childhood immune thrombocytopenia. / Sehgal, Kartik; Guo, Xiuyang; Koduru, Srinivas; Shah, Anumeha; Lin, Aiping; Yan, Xiting; Dhodapkar, Kavita M.

In: Science Translational Medicine, Vol. 5, No. 193, 193ra89, 10.07.2013.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Plasmacytoid dendritic cells, interferon signaling, and FcγR contribute to pathogenesis and therapeutic response in childhood immune thrombocytopenia

AU - Sehgal, Kartik

AU - Guo, Xiuyang

AU - Koduru, Srinivas

AU - Shah, Anumeha

AU - Lin, Aiping

AU - Yan, Xiting

AU - Dhodapkar, Kavita M.

PY - 2013/7/10

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N2 - Immune thrombocytopenia (ITP) is an autoimmune disorder of childhood characterized by immune-mediated destruction of platelets. The mechanisms underlying the pathogenesis of ITP and the therapeutic efficacy of intravenous immunoglobulins (IVIG) in this disorder remain unclear. We show that monocytes from patients with ITP have a distinct gene expression profile, with increased expression of type I interferon response (IR) genes. Plasma from ITP patients had increased levels of several cytokines indicative of immune activation, including an increase in interferon-α. ITP patients also had an increase in plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs) compared to healthy donors. Therapy-induced remission of ITP was associated with abrogation of the IR gene signature in monocytes without reduction in the levels of circulating interferon-α itself. IVIG altered the ratio of activating/inhibitory Fcγ receptors (FcγRs) in vivo primarily by reducing FcγRIII (CD16). The engagement of activating FcγRs was required for IVIG-mediated abrogation of monocyte response to exogenous interferon-α in culture. Moreover, plasma from ITP patients led to activation of monocytes and myeloid DCs in culture with an increase in T cell stimulatory capacity; this activation depended on the engagement of activating FcγRs and interferon-α receptor (IFNAR) and was inhibited by antibody-mediated blockade of these pathways. These data point to a central role of type I interferon in the pathogenesis of ITP and suggest targeting pDCs and blockade of IR as potential therapeutic approaches in this disorder. They also provide evidence for the capacity of IVIG to extinguish IR in vivo, which may contribute to its effects in autoimmunity.

AB - Immune thrombocytopenia (ITP) is an autoimmune disorder of childhood characterized by immune-mediated destruction of platelets. The mechanisms underlying the pathogenesis of ITP and the therapeutic efficacy of intravenous immunoglobulins (IVIG) in this disorder remain unclear. We show that monocytes from patients with ITP have a distinct gene expression profile, with increased expression of type I interferon response (IR) genes. Plasma from ITP patients had increased levels of several cytokines indicative of immune activation, including an increase in interferon-α. ITP patients also had an increase in plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs) compared to healthy donors. Therapy-induced remission of ITP was associated with abrogation of the IR gene signature in monocytes without reduction in the levels of circulating interferon-α itself. IVIG altered the ratio of activating/inhibitory Fcγ receptors (FcγRs) in vivo primarily by reducing FcγRIII (CD16). The engagement of activating FcγRs was required for IVIG-mediated abrogation of monocyte response to exogenous interferon-α in culture. Moreover, plasma from ITP patients led to activation of monocytes and myeloid DCs in culture with an increase in T cell stimulatory capacity; this activation depended on the engagement of activating FcγRs and interferon-α receptor (IFNAR) and was inhibited by antibody-mediated blockade of these pathways. These data point to a central role of type I interferon in the pathogenesis of ITP and suggest targeting pDCs and blockade of IR as potential therapeutic approaches in this disorder. They also provide evidence for the capacity of IVIG to extinguish IR in vivo, which may contribute to its effects in autoimmunity.

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