Point-of-Care Microdevices for Blood Plasma Analysis in Viral Infectious Diseases

Yin Ting Yeh, Merisa Nisic, Xu Yu, Yiqiu Xia, Si Yang Zheng

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Each year, outbreaks of viral infections cause illness, disability, death, and economic loss. As learned from past incidents, the detrimental impact grows exponentially without effective quarantine. Therefore, rapid on-site detection and analysis are highly desired. In addition, for high-risk areas of viral contamination, close monitoring should be provided during the potential disease incubation period. As the epidemic progresses, a response protocol needs tobe rapidly implemented and the virus evolution fully tracked. For these scenarios, point-of-care microdevices can provide sensitive, accurate, rapid and low-cost analysis for a large population, especially in handling complex patient samples, such as blood, urine and saliva. Blood plasma can be considered as a mine of information containing sources and clues of biomarkers, including nucleic acids, immunoglobulin and other proteins, as well as pathogens for clinical diagnosis. However, blood plasma is also the most complicated body fluid. For targeted plasma biomarker detection or untargeted plasma biomarker discovery, the challenges can be as difficult as identifying a needle in a haystack. A useful platform must not only pursue single performance characteristics, but also excel at multiple performance parameters, such as speed, accuracy, sensitivity, selectivity, cost, portability, reliability, and user friendliness. Throughout the decades, tremendous progress has been made in point-of-care microdevices for viral infectious diseases. In this paper, we review fully integrated lab-on-chip systems for blood analysis of viral infectious disease.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalAnnals of Biomedical Engineering
Volume42
Issue number11
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2014

Fingerprint

Biomarkers
Blood
Plasmas
Body fluids
Nucleic acids
Pathogens
Viruses
Costs
Contamination
Proteins
Economics
Monitoring

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Biomedical Engineering

Cite this

Yeh, Yin Ting ; Nisic, Merisa ; Yu, Xu ; Xia, Yiqiu ; Zheng, Si Yang. / Point-of-Care Microdevices for Blood Plasma Analysis in Viral Infectious Diseases. In: Annals of Biomedical Engineering. 2014 ; Vol. 42, No. 11.
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Point-of-Care Microdevices for Blood Plasma Analysis in Viral Infectious Diseases. / Yeh, Yin Ting; Nisic, Merisa; Yu, Xu; Xia, Yiqiu; Zheng, Si Yang.

In: Annals of Biomedical Engineering, Vol. 42, No. 11, 01.01.2014.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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