Policing ourselves

Defining the boundaries of appropriate discussion in online forums

Johndan Johnson-Eilola, Stuart Selber

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

11 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Arguing that the discourses in which we write also write us, this essay examines some language-related regulating mechanisms that function in online forums supported by wide-area networks (WANs). In particular, it examines one online forum conventionally defined as open, the LISTSERV discussion list TECHWR-L, and considers some positionings and restrictions that both validate and invalidate participants' conversational topics. This essay broadly considers the question of democracy as it relates to electronic conversations, contending that what often delimits the boundaries of appropriate discussion in online forums includes not just software and hardware features but a wide range of discursive conditions.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)269-291
Number of pages23
JournalComputers and Composition
Volume13
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 1996

Fingerprint

Wide area networks
Hardware
hardware
conversation
electronics
democracy
discourse
language
software

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Computer Science(all)
  • Language and Linguistics
  • Education
  • Linguistics and Language

Cite this

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Policing ourselves : Defining the boundaries of appropriate discussion in online forums. / Johnson-Eilola, Johndan; Selber, Stuart.

In: Computers and Composition, Vol. 13, No. 3, 01.12.1996, p. 269-291.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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